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Lost At Sea: Art Recovered from Shipwrecks at Asian Art Museum in San Fran, CA

Discussion in 'Underwater Treasures' started by KathyV, Jan 6, 2020.

  1. KathyV

    KathyV Orca

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Midwestern US
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  2. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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    Wow!! Wish I could go.
     
    KathyV likes this.
  3. KathyV

    KathyV Orca

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Midwestern US
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    Me too!
     
  4. WeRtheOcean

    WeRtheOcean Nassau Grouper

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    Thanks for the heads up. It so happens I'm in the area.
     
    KathyV likes this.
  5. KathyV

    KathyV Orca

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    Location: Midwestern US
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    Lucky you! Please give us a report about the exhibit!
     
  6. WeRtheOcean

    WeRtheOcean Nassau Grouper

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    It is a small exhibit, on the second floor in one small gallery. The exhibit was in two sections.

    Section one was 16th century Vietnamese export ceramics -- mostly off-white with painted blue designs. The ship was a native type, based on a Chinese junk, but with Southeast Asian construction techniques. It hadn't gotten very far; it sank in the Cham Islands. It came to light when fishermen began finding the artifacts in their trawl nets.

    Section two was architectural elements from Cham temples -- a Hindu people who lived there before the present-day Vietnamese. By French colonial times, the Cham temples were mostly in ruins, and a French doctor stationed in Vietnam removed some pieces of the ruins to ship to France. The ship was French, named Le Meikong, and was wrecked off Somalia on its way to the Suez Canal.

    Besides the artifacts and their stories, the exhibit also discussed the ethics of undersea archaeology, and the different points of view as to who owns such artifacts, and whether they should even be excavated.
     
    driftwood, KathyV and wnissen like this.
  7. KathyV

    KathyV Orca

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Midwestern US
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    Thank you for sharing, they are such unknown pieces of history for many of us.
     

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