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Minimalist versus "Train as you Fight" . . . Which way do you go?

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba' started by Jax, Jun 9, 2011.

  1. Jax

    Jax Deplorable American ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: AZ TX
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    [hijack]Thank you guys for all of this information and opinion -- It's like being mentored by the whole world!!!! Lots to think about and consider. [/hijack]

    :hugs:

    :focus:
     
    Walter likes this.
  2. Jax

    Jax Deplorable American ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: AZ TX
    26,728
    8,980
    :thumb: That bears repeating!
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2011
  3. Tienuts

    Tienuts Instructor, Scuba

    557
    125
    I disagree. Nothing changes when I go from wet to dry, even my fins stay the same.

    Here's an example - When I started CCR, I had just finished my OC trimix. I had done OOA drills ad nauseum. About 10 hours into my CCR diving, I was approached by a OOA diver, and my first reaction was to donate my long hose. Except I was on CCR, and I ended up pulling my DSV out of my mouth, flooding the loop in the process. Thankfully, I didn't have a deco obligation, so it wasn't a big deal, but I've never dove OC again since then.
     
  4. Thalassamania

    Thalassamania Diving Polymath ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: On a large pile of smokin' A'a, the most isolated
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    Has been fatal.

    Thinking something through (complete with previsualization and such) is a mite different from just reading a book in the abstract. There was an interesting experiment done a few decades back, if anyone out there knows the reference I'd love to have it, having lost it years ago. Anyway, a group of people who had never played basketball were taught to shoot layups. Then for a few weeks half the group practiced shooting layups while the other half sat in a meditative surround and visualized making layups. Then the two groups were brought together and tested on their ability to successful shoot an undefended layup. The visualizers significantly outscored the practicers. Weird, huh?

    Practice, especially gear manipulation, is important. Such practice should go to the core solutions of problems, however. For example, I do not think it sufficient to discard your primary, tuck your chin, and bite into your auxiliary. I think you need to practice reaching back to where your IP hose attaches to the first stage and then follow it all the way to where ever you place your auxiliary, and then bite into it. Make the same sort of extension to the core solution with all exercises and never practice in a fashion that is dependent on your method of securing the piece ot gear to your rig. That's my view if it.

    I think that a minimalist approach to gear selection is very worthwhile.
     
    fjpatrum and lowviz like this.
  5. GrumpyOldGuy

    GrumpyOldGuy Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: West Texas/NH/CA
    4,579
    2,444
    While you would blame the flooding on using different gear, I could also chalk it up to reacting without thinking. If I was really harsh, I would toss out the old "you are using gear to replace skill " slogan.
     
  6. Hallmac

    Hallmac Instructor, Scuba

    1,157
    66
    Is this the same army as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"?

    I have yet to see anything the army says actually put into use. Equipment is changed as needed, added to or taken from one to another, picked up or drop as necessary.

    Training is given on equipment use that is never used but might be in certain situations.

    Flexibility, proper training, and experience is the key.

    My kits change for the mission
     
  7. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
    7,438
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    New skill/drill.

    -noted.
     
  8. Thalassamania

    Thalassamania Diving Polymath ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: On a large pile of smokin' A'a, the most isolated
    22,171
    2,774
    Lowviz, as you modify your practice regimen I'd love to hear about what you find that you find that you change.
     
  9. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
    7,438
    4,406
    Will do.

    Not diving today, halfway through my American Red Cross "Wilderness First Aid" course...
     
  10. RTee

    RTee Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Ottawa, ON
    1,286
    180
    Diveprof...I am a tactical aviator and I would beg to differ with your comment one size fits all. In fact there are times that we will adapt particular equipment for particular missions or flights however, the basic platform does not change nor does the flying procedures, crew duties, look out, checklist, etc.

    If I refer to Jax`s question or query, my basic configuration (back plate/wg/webbing, can light, pouches with accessories (back-up lights, knife, spare mask, SMB with reel, etc) and where I clip my camera when I bring it) remains pretty much the same notwithstanding if I am diving BP/Wg Single cylinder or my SS BP/Wg with doubles. What may change will be thermal protection (drysuit, 7mm, 3mm), weight (adapted to config/thermal protection), number of cylinders (single, doubles, and stage bottles).
     

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