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Multiple Critter ID help - Pompano Beach Florida

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by designbysue, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. Papa_Bear

    Papa_Bear Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaumont CA
    2,248
    10
    0
    Defiantly not an Orange file fish, Possibly a Planehead? (Monacanthus hispidus) The Blenny is a Molly Miller Scartella cristata in a color variation I am saying it because of the feathery fins, not on the diamond or saddle!
     
  2. designbysue

    designbysue Barracuda

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Newburgh, NY
    397
    27
    28
    Thanks for the replies. I do really need help on the IDs as I have the entire set of the Humann books but couldn't find matches for these (except as stated I thought the octopus was a two spot but wanted confirmation as the spot doesn't look blue as described in the book). If any have visited my site you will see that I try to label the pics and don't like to be incorrect in my labels. I see that there are posts that link to the gallery this was an error and I can't delete the post. Sorry if this inconvenienced anyone! justleesa can you please delete the links that are not to a single photo for me please

    #4 was on a night dive at about 50 feet - I have never seen this color variation before.

    The rest of the pics were during the day - most on the side of a wreck at about 70 feet (except the blenny)

    Thanks again for your help

    Sue
     
  3. ryan115

    ryan115 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: St. Petersburg, FL
    139
    14
    18
    #4 is definatly an orange filefish Aluterus schoepfi
     
  4. deborahdelamar

    deborahdelamar Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Cozumel, MX
    1,352
    366
    83
  5. perdidochas

    perdidochas Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Pensacola
    394
    0
    0
    looks like a filefish of some kind, but a pretty sorry specimen of it.
     
  6. Papa_Bear

    Papa_Bear Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaumont CA
    2,248
    10
    0
    Where are the File Spurs on the tail? Orange "File" fish have a rasp looking barb on their tail and they a very visible, even from the top! So what are you basing your "Findings" on? Otherwise nice guess, but I would say wrong! Buzzzzzzzzz!
     
  7. deborahdelamar

    deborahdelamar Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Cozumel, MX
    1,352
    366
    83
    If you're asking me. I stated Orange as a best guess based on the following from Reefnet's Fish ID DVD - It doesn't mention the spurs:

    Description: It has a deep and very compressed body that can be pale to dark gray or brown, and covered with tiny orange spots. The intensity of its colouration can vary, sometimes showing a pattern of dark blotches. It has dark lips, very small scales, a prominent but very thin first dorsal spine, a hardly noticeable second dorsal spine, and no pelvic spine. Its fan-like caudal fin is broad and rounded when fully open but is usually folded into a long, narrow, and limp clump of rays. Its upper head profile is straight to slightly concave. It is typically 12 inches long but can reach 24 inches.

    Habitat and Behaviour: It is usually found in shallow water (to 40 feet) swimming or drifting in pairs (or more) near the bottom over sand, mud, broken coral, rocks, and especially sea grass. Occasionally it is seen on reefs and in depths to 150 feet. Tilted head-down it swims slowly over the bottom by undulating its soft dorsal and anal fins as it grazes on algae, sea grasses, and other sea plants. Juveniles drift with floating sargassum in open water. It is shy and difficult to approach.

    Abundance and Distribution: Its range extends from Nova Scotia to Brazil, including all parts of the West Indies. It is common in the Gulf of Mexico, with juveniles found in inshore waters and adults on offshore reefs; occasional in the Bahamas and Florida; rare in the Caribbean.

    I thought it was a Planehead at first, too, because of the angle of the head. But, after further research at the same source, I ruled it out -- the Planehead is more compact than the one in the photo - looks sort of like a pancake with sloping head, fins and tail.

    I wish I could post the sketches here for comparison -- the were furnished by NOAA -- but I couldn't find them on the internet & don't know how to do it from the DVD.
     
  8. ryan115

    ryan115 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: St. Petersburg, FL
    139
    14
    18
    For one the Planehead filefish Stephanolepis hispidusStephanolepis hispidus, Planehead filefish: fisheries, aquarium only gets to about 10" where as the Orange filefish Aluterus schoepfiAluterus schoepfii, Orange filefish: fisheries, aquarium gets to about 2', even in the picture the fish looks to be about 16"-20".
    Also the enlarged scales on the caudal peduncle are not so greatly pronounced to be easily visible from a distance. They are nothing larger than the raised pieces that you would find on a wood working rasp.
    If you follow this link </title></head> <body></body></html> <html> <head> <title>Identification Keys with Aluterus scriptus and click on the link and click open key - this will bring you to a key to the Monocanthids. You can ID the fish again and rethink your last post.

    BTW I just came off of an offshore research trip where we saw at least 100 of each species each day. So please bring forth any doubts that you still have and I can address them for you.
     
  9. ryan115

    ryan115 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: St. Petersburg, FL
    139
    14
    18
  10. deborahdelamar

    deborahdelamar Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Cozumel, MX
    1,352
    366
    83
    Thanks again, Ryan115. I, like designbysue, use this forum to learn about the fishes and appreciate your reference to the appropriate Fishbase ID key -- now I see what Papa Bear meant by "spurs." I find Fishbase difficult to use & hope it will become easier with practice.
     

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