• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Solo cave dive and octopus/ Sea tiger night dive

Discussion in 'Underwater Videography' started by Wilderness Medic, Aug 25, 2016.

  1. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC PADI Pro

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: United States
    3,392
    3,803
    113
    No no, by all means, go spear fishing, catch all you want. But harassing animals is pretty much the equivalent of kicking your dog, then chasing after it so you can do it again, then do it again for one more playful go at it.

    You want to catch an animal, kill, and eat it, by all means knock yourself out. But if you want to mess with animals just to mess with them, that's just stupid behavior. Especially considering that octopus is probably smarter than you are.
     
    StefinSB, Lorenzoid and Skeptic14 like this.
  2. Wilderness Medic

    Wilderness Medic Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    74
    13
    8
    My mistake, you sounded very anti hunting in your response.
    But no, no it isn't the equivalent of kicking your dog. Wow. So I catch him and butcher him that's ok. I hold him and let him swim around but that's abuse? Lmao. Act like I took rocks and beat him with them to tortute it. FYI it's the ocean. Thousands and millions of sea creatures are "harassed" constantly.
     
  3. pasley

    pasley Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lakewood, CA
    3,121
    198
    63
    Grabbing an octopus just to grab it and "play with him" is IMHO, not too cool. The animal felt threatened to the point of inking not just once but over 5 times. This stresses the animal. It also places the animal in a position of swimming in daylight through the water and attracting the attention of another animal who is looking for dinner. We are guest in their world. While I will, on occasion "play" with an octopus, I normally limit it to offering my hand near them so that if they choose to they can investigate it and perhaps crawl into it. I do not grab then, or chase them or otherwise cause them harm or cause them to flee and ink. Besides if it was a Giant Pacific Octopus (GPO) it was a young baby not much over 2 feet or so let him get to full size before you engage in repeated catch and release antics. Just my 2 cents. Hunting for food is one thing, but taxing the energy (exerted in fleeing and producing more ink) of any marine life by "harassing" it is not cool.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2016
  4. Wilderness Medic

    Wilderness Medic Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    74
    13
    8
    You're entitled to your opinion. The way I look at it, there's an ocean full of predators far worse than I. I'm one small fry swimming around. A predator could get that octopus, or I could, or a predator could get me... Life in the ocean... Full of "harassment"
     
  5. pasley

    pasley Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lakewood, CA
    3,121
    198
    63
    The government pisses away millions of dollars a day, so my pissing away this paltry $1,000 is nothing. True, but the journey of a thousand miles starts with just one step. A million dollars is just a bunch of dollar bills. We can't change the world, but we can change ourselves and by changing one person at a time we can change the world. We are guest in the ocean, taking dinner from the ocean is one thing, but stressing an animal until they ink multiple times is rather like pulling the wings off a butterfly. Just not necessary to have fun. Offer your hand and let the octopus decide if it wants to interact with you. You will do what ever you want, but as you can see by post here many divers believe in a hands off policy. And that is all I have to say on the subject.
     
    Skeptic14 likes this.
  6. Imbodie

    Imbodie PADI Pro

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Nashville TN
    369
    73
    28
    I think the moral of the story here is... do what ever... just don't film it and then post to Scubaboard , Facebook, or youtube :) unless you WANT to be scrutinized...
     
  7. Wilderness Medic

    Wilderness Medic Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    74
    13
    8
    Well the funny thing about that statement is I've posted it to all of the above, and more. Scuba board is the first to "scrutinize" me. I don't mind if people feel the need to vocalize their beliefs. I think it's a tad funny and illogical, but to each his own.
     
  8. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    25,636
    17,121
    113
    What you are experiencing in this case is something I have described as the "birds of a feather" syndrome. Birds of a feather really do flock together, so people who are used to expressing ideas in front of friends and getting universal approval are sometimes surprised when they step out of that normal circle and find that there is a significant portion of the world that does not agree.

    A former major league pitcher from the deep south, John Rocker, made the kind of comments he was used to making all his life the first time he was interviewed by Sports Illustrated, and he was shocked by the country's reaction to his perceived racism. A UCLA student posted a Youtube video about the way Asian students talk in the library that her friends evidently thought was hilarious. After the video went viral and the world reacted differently to her racism, she dropped out of school.

    We had a situation like this on ScubaBoard a while ago. After people started diving the wreck of the Oriskany off of Pensacola, FL, a man accustomed to diving wrecks off the New Jersey shore headed down with all his tools and took out a major communications system. He went online and bragged about it, thanking the captain of the boat that took him there for his help. In New Jersey, taking everything you can from wrecks is part of the culture, but for most of the diving world, it is just plain wrong. In fact, in the case of the Oriskany, it is against the law. (I believe the captain tried his best to pretend he had not helped the guy break the law.) The resulting thread was a humdinger, with the "take anything you want" crew and the "you saw it--leave it for others" crew yelling at each other with no resolution. I think each side in the debate was shocked to learn the other side existed.

    The same thing is true for what you did in this video. There are people who think it is perfectly fine to harass sea life, but there are many who don't like it at all, and they will not be shy about telling you that. I am one who does not like it at all myself. I once started a planned dive week with Big Island Divers in Kona, Hawaui'i. On the second dive of the first day of diving, the DM manhandled an octopus the way you did, producing about the same amount of ink you did. I switched to a different operator for the rest of the week, and I made sure I mentioned in on ScubaBoard. In fact, I mentioned it a number of times on ScubaBoard. This is probably the 10th time I have written that the DM at Big Island Divers in Kona manhandled an octopus that way, and I will bet they have lost thousands of dollars of business because of it.
     
  9. Wilderness Medic

    Wilderness Medic Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    74
    13
    8
    I guess it it a culture thing. I have experienced the "touch nothing" attitude of diving in Hawaii.... I wouldn't mess with a sea turtle or anything like that there. But this is my home turf where going down and cutting apart octopus and taking them for food is a regular thing. Including sometimes maiming one and coming up with only one tentacle(they do grow back). I understand to some this is appalling. But it is common hunting. On land you don't always get a clean shot on a deer. To me this is the equivalent of stalking a deer and slapping it on the behind and not shooting it.

    I can respect other people's views if they can respect mine :wink:
     
  10. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid idling in neutral buoyancy

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Atlanta, USA
    9,286
    5,869
    113

Share This Page