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stuck insert in provalve

Discussion in 'Tanks, Valves and Bands' started by mjones78, Oct 18, 2016.

  1. mjones78

    mjones78 Garibaldi

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    Thanks all for the suggestions! If I have any luck I will post.
     
  2. Frontpointer1000

    Frontpointer1000 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: A little higher, a little colder
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    Where did you get your information? I'm certainly no genius when it comes to this, but it seems that silicone is highly hydrophobic, especially in a static state, so it seems difficult to draw in fluid (salt water in this case) or "absorb" fluid to a significant factor, since they are immiscible. I do admit however, that silicone components are not 100% water proof and can carry water. Semantics, perhaps.

    See below:
    "The way a lubricant performs in the presence of water depends on the amount of water, its corrosive nature (salt water, alkali), and the operating conditions — dynamic or static. For example, some water-resistant greases are suitable for static sealing but not for lubricating roller bearings under dynamic conditions."

    "Lubricants absorb water to different degrees depending on the lubricant type and the degree of mechanical action in the lubricated components. Most oils have low resistance to water absorption. Therefore, greases are usually applied where water resistance is needed."

    Engineering Essentials: Lubrication Tips & The Effect of Water (Part 3)

    Again, like I said, I'm not an expert in this area (I was asking a question about the lubes to use in this very thread), but I'm not sure the above statement it's sccurate. If you have better data or info, please post.

    Nonetheless, the thermo valve maintenance instructions do not mention using a lubricant on the din provalve adapter (part #24).

    Please see:
    Dive Industry Technician Service Course, scuba regulators spare parts, compressors, scuba tanks, regulator service manuals
     
  3. Hickdive

    Hickdive Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Glasgow, UK
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    "Absorb" may be the wrong word but what silicon grease does do is retain saltwater, by whatever mechanism, on the threads leaving a salty/silicon residue which binds the threads. Omit the silicon and the problem doesn't happen. Only my experience from servicing hundreds of cylinder valves and regulators where the #2 problem (#1 being neglect) is over zealous use of silicon grease.

    Of course, if you've done the ASSET course then you know this.
     
  4. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
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    also the same reason that no one lubricates their din screws on the regulators, or the yoke screws on the valves. They are very active and dynamic screws so they shouldn't bind under normal use cycles as long as they are properly rinsed.
     
  5. Frontpointer1000

    Frontpointer1000 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: A little higher, a little colder
    205
    153
    43

    Man, I dont even know what the ASSET course is! That's why I love SB, I learn something daily.
     
  6. mjones78

    mjones78 Garibaldi

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    So i had pretty good success. I had 5 valves with stuck inserts. I was able to get one out with no damage to the insert. I got two others out but had to use an easyout because the allens stripped, so will need to replace the inserts. the remaining two valves I wassn't successful on and gave up because it would have required time that I felt wasn't worth putting into them. I could have done a number of things to get more aggressive though.

    I used a combination of heat and cold although I soaked the valves in vinegar overnight. I don't believe the vinegar was helpful in my case but perhaps other less-stuck inserts would benefit. I disassembled the valves completely and propped up a heat gun at the insert end of the valve (while in a vice), let the heat gun blow on the valve for 10 minutes, then immediately shot the insert with a cold spray (chewing gum remover), then attempted removing the inserts. It was a quick and simple process since I had the tools.

    Thanks again for everyone's suggestions!
     
    halocline and awap like this.
  7. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    what kind of force were you using to try to break them? Impact or leverage?
     
  8. BRT

    BRT Orca

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    I lubricate my yoke screws and the difference is amazing!
     
  9. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
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    check back after you dive in high particulate water or after 3-6 months diving in salt. There is a damn good reason the manufacturers don't spec that as a lubricated parts. It's been mentioned above already, the lubricant makes them spin easier but it also attracts EVERYTHING, sand, grit, all sorts of nasty stuff that can cause problems to the threads
     
    awap likes this.
  10. BRT

    BRT Orca

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    I primarily dive in salt and I've lubed them for years.
     

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