• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

The Jaw-Dropping Stats from Hurricane Irma

Discussion in 'Sea Save Foundation' started by Sea Save Foundation, Sep 19, 2017.

  1. Sea Save Foundation

    Sea Save Foundation Sea Save Foundation Leader

    1,110
    79
    48
    These statistics include Hurricane Irma being the strongest Atlantic basin hurricane ever recorded, the longest (3 days) category 5 storm since satellite tracking began, record 37 hours of winds at or above 185 mph and a record 6,300,000 people evacuated in Florida.

    Read more here (story #4).

    hurricane-irma-boats.jpe
     
  2. Skeptic14

    Skeptic14 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Va
    616
    371
    63
    2005 Atlantic hurricane season - Wikipedia

    2005 season...

    Dennis: 150mph/930mb
    Emily: 160mph/929mb
    Katrina: 175mph/902mb
    Rita: 180mph/895mb
    Wilma: 185mph/882mb

    The 1961 season had 7 major hurricanes including...

    Betsy: 145/945
    Carla: 175/931
    Esther: 145/927
    Hattie: 160/920

    Of course there is the 1969 season with 5 majors including of course still one of the largest ever Camille with 175mph winds and a 900mb pressure...

    There have been six seasons where more than one category five storm formed...

    1932,1933, 1961, 2005, 2007, 2017

    But wait there's more...

    Only since the late 40s did we start flying into tropical systems as a way to measure them and not until the 70s was a method of using satellite imagery to estimate strength created.

    So to draw any type of conclusions on long term trends of tropical system strength by cherry picking data points over such an absurdly insignificant time frame is very unscientific.

    It's of course one of humans most common flaws, false positives, finding patterns that simply don't exist, and confirmation bias when our preconceived expectations are met and ignoring all of the times when they aren't (10 of 14 ... 71% of systems this season amounted to nothing).
     
    Mrs. B, mmadiver, EdC and 6 others like this.
  3. tridacna

    tridacna ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Jersey
    5,722
    2,737
    113
    Malarkey. You almost sounded credible.

    The 2017 Hurricane Season Really Is More Intense Than Normal
     
    sassyalice likes this.
  4. Skeptic14

    Skeptic14 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Va
    616
    371
    63
    Quotes from your own link...

    It probably won’t be the most active season on record. That dubious distinction belongs, by a large margin, to 2005 and its 28 named storms... Fifteen of the storms (another record) were hurricanes... Five names (yet another record) were retired: Dennis, Rita, Stan, Wilma and, of course, Katrina. The 2017 season is unlikely to match that...

    So no malarkey yet, lets keep going.

    Currently, the 1933 season, with 20 named storms, sits in second place after 2005. Behind that are five seasons that produced 19 named storms apiece, one that produced 18, three that had 16 and four that had 15, according to Weather Underground, which maintains a list of the “top 10 busiest Atlantic hurricane seasons.” By the end of November, that list will almost certainly include 2017.

    So in summary my post was malarkey despite your own citation providing some of the exact data of past seasons that were more active than 2017.

    Further, your own citation points out that accurate record keeping didn't start until 1851, of course we had no way of measuring the strength of the storms at that point, but that's still an insanely insignificant time frame to draw any scientific conclusions on storm intensity and strength trends.

    So I'm not sure which part was malarkey, I suppose someone pointing out nothing but the numbers and reality and not applying spin to achieve a certain preconceived narrative bothered you.
     
    kelemvor and Joneill like this.
  5. tridacna

    tridacna ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Jersey
    5,722
    2,737
    113
    No. Fact Denial bothers me.
     
    RyanT likes this.
  6. Skeptic14

    Skeptic14 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Va
    616
    371
    63
    So you must be really bothered by yourself right about now... unless maybe you missed those parts from your own citation?
     
    Joneill likes this.
  7. tridacna

    tridacna ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Jersey
    5,722
    2,737
    113
    Arguing with denial trolls just not my thing. Sorry.
     
  8. Bubblesong

    Bubblesong Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Massachusetts
    2,290
    1,912
    113
    climate change, whether you believe it or not, is not giving us bigger hurricanes than past years.
    Greenhouse effects may do other things, but the hurricanes and gawdawful storms at sea were recorded in biblical times.
     
    Mrs. B and Joneill like this.
  9. tridacna

    tridacna ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Jersey
    5,722
    2,737
    113
    I doubt whether anyone is seriously denying climate change. It's the causes that are being questioned. I presume that as a Marine Scientist you simply wrote that wrong.

    I also question your premise. I believe that warmer oceans are delivering bigger and more frequent catastrophic weather events. But I prefer to argue in a legitimate academic forum. This forum is so full of argumentative trolls seeking to get a rise out of people - it's not funny.

    I'm also certain that "Biblical times" references are not exactly accurate either. Good luck with referencing those. (Please do not use "hath", "frogs", "thee" or "lice".)
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2017
  10. Bubblesong

    Bubblesong Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Massachusetts
    2,290
    1,912
    113
    Jupiter has much worse storms than earth, and it is cold as f@&k.
    There are other factors contributing to Hurricanes than a couple degrees warmer oceans.
    My thought is that the ice packs melting raising sea levels around the world are changing the stresses on the ocean floor, and that is causing more, bigger earthquakes.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2017
    Mrs. B likes this.

Share This Page