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What's this?

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by florentny, May 26, 2004.

  1. florentny

    florentny Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: New York, NY
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  2. diver_paula

    diver_paula Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Southfield, MI
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  3. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
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    Paula's right, looks like a sea pen. Kinda funny place and depth to see one, however. They like soft bottom, and a bit deeper water. They shouldn't be next to a gorgonian (which attached to hard bottom), certainly.
     
  4. Mako Mark

    Mako Mark Dive Charter

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    that is part of the family known as "squidgy gooey fishy things"

    as opposed to the other two families of sealife: the creepy crawly crunchy things and the scaly slimy bitey things"


    It looks like a sea pen to me...
     
  5. adshepard

    adshepard Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: New England
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  6. Nay

    Nay Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Orange County, CA
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    LOL!!!
    I'm sitting here at my desk and I'm sure that if a co-worker looked over they'd think I'm nuts! Thanks for a Friday giggle.

    I have no idea what's in the picture unfortunatly.
     
  7. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Florida
    5,018
    90
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    Oh yeah! Egg case is more plausible, 'specially if it's ATTACHED to the gorgonian as opposed to being sitting next to it. Maybe an elasmobranch egg case...

    As to it "most definitely" not being a sea pen, please post the reasoning. As the axial polyp cannot be seen from the angle of the photo, and the secondary polyps could be retracted, I see no clear cut visual reason arguing it NOT being a sea pen. A lot of the Virgularia-type pennatulaceans look very much like this.
     
  8. adshepard

    adshepard Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: New England
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    The object you are looking at is cylindrical sea pens are not cylindrical! Sea pens are in most all cases burrowed into a soft substrate. Go do a search either on the Internet or in texts of Virgularia species and find one that is cylindrical. Be serious. The object in question is an egg case.

    Sometimes your know-it-all postings about marine life are very annoying and wrong.

    DSDO

    Alan
     
  9. glbirch

    glbirch Solo Diver

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    Wow. They posted opinions, admitted to uncertainty, and Archman even asked you for more info on your reasoning. Hardly the postings of "know-it-all's".
     
  10. adshepard

    adshepard Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: New England
    280
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    It's a comment on reading many of his postings.

    DSDO

    Alan
     

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