• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Deviated septum

Discussion in 'Diving Medicine' started by edylchtims, Apr 10, 2008.

  1. edylchtims

    edylchtims Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Daniels, West Virginia
    21
    0
    0
    How does a deviated septum affect ear clearing?
     
  2. crpntr133

    crpntr133 lost, even with a compass

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: West Central Indiana
    6,189
    6
    38
    Depends upon how it lies. Mine was way off and caused the nasal flow to redirect more over the Eustachian tubes. Thus I could hardly clear. My ENT told me that without surgery I would never dive and couldn't see how I flew for so many years.
    Surgery wasn't the most fun thing that I have ever done in my life but it wasn't bad. All in all it was worth a couple days of mild pain.
     
  3. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member Staff Member

    5,601
    393
    83
    Hi edylchtims,

    The normal flow of air through the nose and sinuses is disrupted by a deviated septum. The flow on the side of the deviation will be reduced, and if the deviation is severe enough it can essentially block air movement on that side altogether. Conversely, air flow may be greater than normal on the side opposite the deviation. Deviated septum also is associated with sinus problems, particularly congestion and infection, which can cause similar obstruction.

    The resulting differential air flow may create differential pressures on the eustachian tubes where they enter the throat. Imbalance in pressure equalization of the ears can ensue.

    Helpful?

    Regards,

    DocVikingo
     
  4. edylchtims

    edylchtims Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Daniels, West Virginia
    21
    0
    0
    Thanks DocVikingo
    My nose tilts to the left and that is the side I have trouble clearing. I am contemplating surgery. Some previous threads have indicated various recovery times from the surgery and I don't want to miss out on diving. I guess I need to get advice from an ENT.
     
  5. crpntr133

    crpntr133 lost, even with a compass

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: West Central Indiana
    6,189
    6
    38
    I was out for three weeks. Yours may vary.
    If you do it be prepared for a new life. I haven't had a sinus infection since. I am now a nose breather and the tartar build up on my teeth is less. Many other things as well.
     
    Tricia likes this.
  6. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member Staff Member

    5,601
    393
    83
    Hi edylchtims,

    It is the expectation that clearing issues would be on the same side as the deviation.

    Divers with problems in equalization due to a seriously deviated septum typically report much improved lives both topside and u/w following surgery.

    Return to SCUBA post-septoplasty depends upon a number of factors, including the extent of surgery and procedure used, any complications that may arise, and speed of healing. Given a routine procedure and uncomplicated recovery, healing usually is sufficient to allow for scuba after 3-4 weeks. Some divers return to the water after 2-3 weeks, but given possible trauma to the nose from such things as breathing hyper-dry air, the Valsalva maneuver and pressure from the face mask, it seems prudent to err on the side of conservatism.

    Obviously the ENT will be in the best position to advise on matters of timing.

    Helpful?

    Regards,

    DocVikingo

    This is educational only and does not constitute or imply a doctor-patient relationship. It is not medical advice to you or any other individual, and should not be construed as such.
     
  7. harb99

    harb99 Guest

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Southeast Missouri
    12
    0
    0
    I had my nose fixed several years ago prior to doing much diving - it improved my topside breathing and my wife noticed much less snoring from me.

    Just a note - when I went to the ENT following the nose injury, she found a previous break that was probably a part of the nasal issues that I was having prior to the injury. She fixed both and now as I stated, breathing through my nose is much improved.
     
  8. crpntr133

    crpntr133 lost, even with a compass

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: West Central Indiana
    6,189
    6
    38
    Most septums are broken during birth. You never know it is the bad thing.
     
  9. phantomrfa

    phantomrfa Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: north kent ,u.k.
    54
    0
    0
    I had the same problem ,didn't find out until i started diving .don't worry simple op to fix day case in at 10am out by 4pm no diving for 3 months get final ok from doc and away you go
     

Share This Page