Important!: Mathematics of Scuba Diving!

Discussion in 'New Divers and Those Considering Diving' started by wilson_12, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. wilson_12

    wilson_12 Garibaldi

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    Hey everybody, I am doing a project for my math class about the mathematics of scuba diving, but the thing is that I'm new to scuba diving don't have a great knowledge of it.
    Can you guys tell me about how math is involved in scuba diving? How does math tie in with scuba diving? This is very important, and if I could get this info as soon as possible that'd be great! Thanks very much!
     
  2. jbd

    jbd Scuba Instructor

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    Think of the gas laws. There is also figuring PO2 and MOD if diving nitrox. Of course the dive tables and dive computers all use mathematics. You use math to figure SAC rate also.
     
  3. mike_s

    mike_s Blue Whale

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    I imagine Dive Tables and PO2 would be good examples. If you take the Nitrox class you can learn how to compute these all manually.

    Also for navigation your use math. It's based on 360 degrees compass setting, etc. Most compass courses for example have a way were you swim so many kicks and turn 90 degrees and do the same. repeat for a total of 4 times. If you do it perfectly, you'll swim a perfect square with 4 perfect 90 degree turns.


    You could also do math based on air consumption, Boyles Law on Pressure and volume, etc.

    mike
     
  4. Wildcard

    Wildcard Scuba Instructor

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    And to figure bouyancy, air consumption ( if you use x psi of air at 30 feet what will it be at 87 feet?). Also to figure out how much of each paycheck can be spent on diving without causing divorce. Usefull stuff!
     
  5. SeanQ

    SeanQ Single Diver

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    You didn't say what level of math, but I'm assuming high school.

    Check out http://www.iantd.com/rebreather/phys.html It has plenty of intoductory information for gas laws. A diver uses math to figure out what depth is safe for certain gases, etc.

    There are many threads on this board regarding SAC (Surface Air Consumption). A diver can use math to predict how much air they will use at a certain depth. This is an very helpful thing to know when planning dives for obvious reasons.

    Good luck!
     
  6. MaxBottomtime

    MaxBottomtime Orca

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  7. kazinvan

    kazinvan Barracuda

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    I don't think we should be doing your homework for you. I'm sure you can find the answer in a few minutes using google.
     
  8. wilson_12

    wilson_12 Garibaldi

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    Believe me buddy, I have been looking and getting all sorts of info over the web, I just thought it might make sense to ask scuba divers about this subject...
     
  9. simbrooks

    simbrooks Snr LayZboy Meteorologist ScubaBoard Supporter

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    The actual mathmatical manipulations used by most divers are simple, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, nothing complex there. The derivation of dive tables and no decompression limits is based on half-lives, so there are bound to be exponentials, possibly even more complex integration and differentiation (partial possibly). I believe the use of gas laws to do with gas pressure/volume/temperature and partial pressure work have been covered and Archimedes principle too by other posters above. There isnt much else that people really deal with on a day to day basis with diving.
     
  10. freediver

    freediver Scuba Instructor

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    Math and scuba? OK, Ok....hmmmm
    Here we go.... Johnny spends $1200 on a scuba system and another $700 on a guys trip to Honduras. While there, he spends another $150 on a Nitrox course and buys a new mask for $70. Meanwhile his wife wanted a new dinette set. So the question is ....
    If he is 6'2", how much rope will she need to dangle him from a 10 foot ceiling? (Let's assume he is barefoot) <Jeopardy music in background>
     
  11. simbrooks

    simbrooks Snr LayZboy Meteorologist ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Ooohhhh, i know this one, total length 5ft, enough to give him a bit of elasticity, but she needs some in there to tie a securing knot at the ceiling and a noose at the end, otherwise i would say maximum clear length 3' which is just short enough that he cant touch the floor on tip toes and can "bounce" a bit on the rope's elasticity. Of course if he spends just a little over $2k on a nice vacation for her with the girls or jewelry then this situation may not occur ;)
     
  12. roturner

    roturner ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Hi Wilson

    You can find more about this by looking into a few things.

    Some of the relevant laws of physics for scuba diving are. (gas laws) Boyle's law, Dalton's law, Henry's law, Charle's law and Archimedes principle (buoyancy), principles of heat energy transference (convection, conduction), light, refraction, sound and so forth. A quick look in a basic level scuba manual will give you some good starting points to start looking stuff up. Knowning the names of the gas laws will make searching easier.

    Decompression theory also makes heavy use of mathematics. If you want to really impress your techers you can download a document with huge amounts of mind boggling formulas by clicking here

    R..
     
  13. wilson_12

    wilson_12 Garibaldi

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    hehe, thats pretty good
     
  14. Rookie_J

    Rookie_J Nassau Grouper

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    "Johnny spends $1200 on a scuba system and another $700 on a guys trip to Honduras. While there, he spends another $150 on a Nitrox course and buys a new mask for $70. Meanwhile his wife wanted a new dinette set. So the question is ....
    If he is 6'2", how much rope will she need to dangle him from a 10 foot ceiling?"




    the ceiling is 120" from the floor, Johnny is 74" tall, leaving 46" from the top of his head to the ceiling. on average i would assume a 6'-2" mans inseem is 36", allowing for 4" of testicle stretch, i would say 80" of rope? :errrr:
     
  15. nilsdiver

    nilsdiver DIR Practitioner

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  16. freediver

    freediver Scuba Instructor

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    Great guess Simbrroks, but incorrect and you did not phrase your answer in the form of a question!
     
  17. freediver

    freediver Scuba Instructor

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    I forgot to mention Johnny was castrated 4 years ago. Sorry.
     
  18. simbrooks

    simbrooks Snr LayZboy Meteorologist ScubaBoard Supporter

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    I forgot the jeopardy part, "what is being the diver married to a diving widow?"
     
  19. freediver

    freediver Scuba Instructor

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    We have a winner!
     

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