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Can you sink by blowing up your BC below 40m?

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Boyan, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. Russoft

    Russoft Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Minneapolis
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    This whole thing can be explained rationally with science.

    See this here phase diagram?

    [​IMG]

    The air transitions from a gas into a liquid as we increase pressure. It so happens 40 meters, or 5 ata, is that pressure (assuming the air is at 20 C or 68 F). This is why diving in cold water is more challenging, because the pressure at the phase change is lower. This is also why warm water diving is generally easier.


    :)
     
  2. Boyan

    Boyan Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Vienna
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    I am pretty sure I wasn't trolled, but there is a good chance of misunderstandings. Interesting theories so far :)
     
    bowlofpetunias and Schwob like this.
  3. Schwob

    Schwob Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Illinois - ("Schwob", formerly "Schwaeble")
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    That's the spirit!
    I think
    @Kevrumbo
    put forth a good stab at where the real misunderstanding might have been rooted in. But who knows.
    If you ever find out from your friend, please do let us know.
    Or maybe not, maybe someone can leverage this into a grant to research some of the alternative truthts... um, thoughts...
     
    Boyan likes this.
  4. KWS

    KWS ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SE TEXAS
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    What if the diver self identifies as a negative bubble??????
     
  5. FinnMom

    FinnMom Divemaster Staff Member

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Finland
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    This did make me think how much effort it would require to breath-inflate a BCD against 5 bar of pressure. 5x as difficult as on land is hard to accurately imagine, but it doesn't sound easy. Also thinking this effort would that cause CO2 buildup, or a fuzzy-headedness that would not great when you are removing/replacing your 2nd stage. Not something I intend to try underwater, but in a chamber this would be interesting.
     
  6. Patoux01

    Patoux01 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Geneva
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    The air in your lungs is at 5bar as well at that depth.
     
  7. bowlofpetunias

    bowlofpetunias Giant Squid Staff Member

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Sydney Australia
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    hubby.... @thanksforallthefish only ever orally inflates he says it really hasn't made a difference that he's noticed. He's been to that depth.
     
  8. dberry

    dberry Hydrophilic ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Philadelphia
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    Actually, I think the pressing question is WHY did the fish want to get in there...
     
  9. bowlofpetunias

    bowlofpetunias Giant Squid Staff Member

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Sydney Australia
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    Ongassing???:fear:
     
    Schwob likes this.
  10. kafkaland

    kafkaland Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Saline, Michigan
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    No. The critical point (C) of nitrogen is at 126K, that is below room temperature. So you cannot liquefy nitrogen just by compressing it, no matter how hard you try. It will just get denser and denser, but never outright undergo a phase transition and condensate unless you chill it.
     
    Boyan likes this.

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