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Diving and Seamanship

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Akimbo, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. KevinG58

    KevinG58 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Vallejo California USA
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    Excuse me Captain, where are your fuel shut offs?

    ---------- Post added July 1st, 2014 at 10:15 AM ----------

    I was USN for a very few years back in the old days (70's) but a variety of methods of signaling, from Talk Between Ships short range radio to flashing light or signal flags. Also, sounding the horn. I suppose now they can send a IM or e-mail :D as well.
     
    Akimbo likes this.
  2. Akimbo

    Akimbo Lift to Freedom Volunteer Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Truly well stated, sir. :clapping:

    Thanks
     
  3. Rich Keller

    Rich Keller Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Long Island NY
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    If you are out on boats long enough someone is going to ask you to help tie the boat to the dock, for that you need a simple cleat hitch.

    Cleat Hitch by Pro-Knot
     
    grantwiscour likes this.
  4. Akimbo

    Akimbo Lift to Freedom Volunteer Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    I noticed that your cleat hitch instructions and the one in my OP, don't illustrate how to make the final "twist" on the cleat like an old salt. This video should help even the most "knot challenged" diver look good:

    How to Tie a Cleat Hitch - YouTube

    [video=youtube;VMwXjckgiOs]
     
    grantwiscour likes this.
  5. Eric Sedletzky

    Eric Sedletzky Great White

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Santa Rosa, CA
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    And to take it one step further, here's what you do with the rest of the rope on the dock:
    There's a reason for this. Not only does it look tidy but it's also a safety protocol. If line is strewn all over the dock in a hap hazard fashion it's more likely to trip somebody up and possibly make them fall in the water. When line is wound as shown it sits flat and can be stepped on like a flat pad, with boat/dock shoes or dive booties of course, not construction or cowboy boots.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
    grantwiscour, John_B and Akimbo like this.
  6. Rich Keller

    Rich Keller Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Long Island NY
    3,354
    1,233
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    The one I put up showed line being run under at the end but did not show the twist which is the most common and more correct way to do this. Another thing to know about line is that any knot, hitch or splice you put in it will reduce the safe working load of that line. The overhand knot (the most commonly used and worst knot to use) will reduce the safe working load by 55%. The best would be a short splice that will only reduce the safe working load by 10%. The safe working load of a line is about half the load it will take to break that line. When a line is getting close to breaking you will see it start to wring water and when it is about to break you will see it start smoking.
     
    Akimbo likes this.
  7. Hank49

    Hank49 Solo Diver

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    The problem with that type of coiling is it will be twisted and hard to uncoil without untwisting it. Better to figure 8 wrap it.
     
  8. Rich Keller

    Rich Keller Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Long Island NY
    3,354
    1,233
    113
    For a permanent docking line like this I would have made a eye splice that attached to the cleat and had no left over line to either coil or wrap.
     
  9. Akimbo

    Akimbo Lift to Freedom Volunteer Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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  10. Wingy

    Wingy Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Perth West Aust.
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    On the subject of ropes...a cautionary word to your non boaty friends about the dangers of ropes is always good. Have seen too many people standing in coils of ropes totally oblivious to the dangers - Ive crewed on boats with skippers who have lost fingers to ropes and a young merchant seaman last week lost a leg due to poor rope management so a gentle reminder about ropes may just save someones life or body bits.
     
    falcon125 and BurhanMuntasser like this.

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