• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Emergency or Incident depends on how you see and handle it

Discussion in 'Dive Related Accidents and Problems' started by rkinder, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. rkinder

    rkinder Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Seneca, SC
    41
    44
    18
    I posted this on another site so if you have already seen this forgive me.

    This is a lesson’s learned type of post, as always, I will thank you in advance for reading to the end.

    I spend a lot of time in the water, many times Solo due to the type and frequency of my non-PSD dives. With this in mind I am configured as my own buddy, everything is backed up, with plans for everything except my body failing. I treat every dive as if I am SOLO, even when diving with a group, always planning for a failure or emergency.

    Last night this paid off, some would have seen the following as an emergency but was really just an inconvenience. I was at one of my favorite training sites working current about 700 to 800 feet from my point of entry, at 85 feet, with a 1.5 knot current.

    I tried to take a breath and was rewarded with water and air. To state that my regulator was wet breathing is an understatement. I exhaled then took a slow breath, feeling the water entering slowly I determined it was time to go to my backup system. (Primary is 95 cuf tank Secondary or Pony is also a 95 cuf tank). At this point I flushed the regulator feeling that the exhaust valve had become compromised. Once reassembled the regulator was tested and found to still be wet.

    I aborted the dive the only problem was it took 12 min. to return to the entry point and going straight up to the surface was not a good option, based on current and boat traffic.

    This morning my fears where confirmed a flat piece of organic material had entered the exhaust valve but would not flush thru causing the entry of a large amount of water, it amazed me that the regulator continued to provide air based on the size of the material. I suspect that while gearing up in chest deep water the material entered the regulator and became stuck during the strenuous dive at depth.

    Lessons to be learned from incident:
    1. Well designed equipment allowed for delivery of air even when compromised.
    2. Remain calm, work the problem don’t let the problem work you.
    3. Always have a plan for each potential emergency and a backup plan in case the first does not work.
    4. Make sure you have sufficient emergency gas to get back to safety.
    5. But most important of all is to determine is it an emergency or is it an inconvenience.

    In closing always prepare for failures and problems never let them become more than an inconvenience.
     
  2. Nick Steele

    Nick Steele DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Coral springs
    346
    156
    43
    Glad you weren’t fazed at all! Staying calm is the most important thing in my mind.

    Curious did you have an octo on your main tank?
     
  3. rkinder

    rkinder Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Seneca, SC
    41
    44
    18
    I run two different configurations, this one is rigged as two independent systems, both are identical in size and capability. The only difference being that the right has a 9 foot hose to the second stage. My full face mask rig has two tanks plumbed into a gas block with individual multi-turn shut off valves, with back checks, and the ability to plug in deco-gas or Surface Supplied Air, my right tank has a long hose octo just in case. All dives are started on the left tank keeping the largest reserve for emergencies on the right. I have run this way for 30 plus years. Think of it this way side mount diving except back mounted. In PSD I don't want to risk dragging my gear in the dirt so I stay back mount. For the side mount divers reading this I have no objection to using side mount or no mount where needed, and have done so many times in the past and hopefully into the future.
     
  4. Nick Steele

    Nick Steele DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Coral springs
    346
    156
    43
    Gotcha. Sorry if any confusion but I didn’t realize this was in PSD forum. Good to know though
     
  5. rkinder

    rkinder Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Seneca, SC
    41
    44
    18
    Nick, guess I could have posted in another area as well, and would be willing to do so. Where do you think this would fit best and be of benefit to others?
     
  6. Nick Steele

    Nick Steele DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Coral springs
    346
    156
    43
    It’s fine where it is at. The title caught my eye and I thought it was just in the regular accident and incidence forum.
     

Share This Page