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new Application "Gas blender toolkit"

Discussion in 'Apps, Book and Media Reviews' started by Oleg G., Jun 17, 2019.

  1. Oleg G.

    Oleg G. Angel Fish

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    Good idea, thank you!
    added new mode: (O2, Topoff, He)
     
    RainPilot, Griffo and taimen like this.
  2. Oleg G.

    Oleg G. Angel Fish

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    The question I ask myself is how high is the relevance of the gas density when planning the dive. Whatever must be considered is the toxic and narcotic effect of the respiratory gases in depth. Is there a constellation where we stay within these limits and the gas density exceeds 6 g / l? If this constellation does not exist, does it make sense to consider gas density?
     
    Griffo likes this.
  3. Oleg G.

    Oleg G. Angel Fish

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    g/L for density even in "imperial" units :)
     

    Attached Files:

    RainPilot and blake7 like this.
  4. blake7

    blake7 DIR Practitioner

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    Yes, gas density over 5 g/L might be a more serious issue than ppO2 over 1.4. The Alert Diver article I linked above has a good discussion and shows how CO2 retention starts to spike around 5.2 g/L. For example, 32% is 5.7 g/L at its recreationally acceptable MOD of 110ft.

    IMHO, gas density over 5 g/L is as important as watching the pp02. It is also the best argument for using He at recreational depths--if only He were cheaper...

    Thanks so much for your continuing updates and changes!
     
    RainPilot likes this.
  5. Oleg G.

    Oleg G. Angel Fish

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    A new feature added: during filling the cylinder gets warmed up. It is essential, to know the exactly pressure for deviated temperature. The "Gas blender toolkit" helps to see these deviations with help of so named Isochore of scuba tank.
     

    Attached Files:

    taimen and Griffo like this.
  6. crcobb

    crcobb ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Michigan
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    I frequently blend with banked nitrox, typically 40%. Looking for a mode to calculate how 40 to add to the cylinder and then topping off with air to achieve a desired nitrox mix.
     
  7. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
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    Start with an "unlimited" pressure in the supply tank of 40% (or the volume/pressure of your bank). Sent the pressure to what you want the final fill to be. Set the receiving tank to 21% and it's size, and slide the "existing pressure" until you get your final desired mix in the resulting tank. Subtract the pressures and you have your amounts...

    Now do your fill in the opposite order....
     
    Oleg G. likes this.
  8. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    12,297
    11,010
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    Adjust "A" to get "B"

    upload_2019-6-28_7-38-52.png
     
  9. crcobb

    crcobb ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Michigan
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    Bob,
    Very nice, didn't think of using the calculator in that way. Often the cylinder has remaining nitrox and I'd like to avoid draining the cylinder. So as an example I'd like start with 1500 psi of 28% and be able to calculate how much 40% add and then top off with air (21%) to have a final mix of 32% @ 3442.
     
  10. taimen

    taimen ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Europe
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    Edited. This is great. Makes the app even better. Thank you!

    How do you measure the temperatures during pp filling yourself?
     

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