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Not the best swimmer...

Discussion in 'Going Pro' started by Normal_life_is_just_SI, Sep 7, 2019.

  1. dumpsterpurrs

    dumpsterpurrs Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Southeast Asia
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    Arm tow is the preferred method. Allows one hand below victims chin, one hand holding on to victims arm, and push by kicking with your fins. Gives you easy access to their face to give rescue breaths too.
     
  2. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    12,126
    2,614
    113
    Yeah, seems we had similar rescue training. I'm not gunna re-read the old posts, but did anyone suggest performing a rescue doing a swimmer's crawl? Would seem impossible to me since you're swimming with both arms and legs.....
     
  3. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
    8,030
    5,723
    113
    5 secs, not 10 secs
     
    dumpsterpurrs likes this.
  4. dumpsterpurrs

    dumpsterpurrs Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Southeast Asia
    114
    50
    28
    ....anddddd my victim dies :76feet::D thanks for the reminder :oops:
     
  5. dumpsterpurrs

    dumpsterpurrs Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Southeast Asia
    114
    50
    28
    @TMHeimer here's where the arm tow discussion started, you can flip back one page, towards the end.

    The swim test is, I think, about stamina, comfort with in water stressful situations, water(wo)manship, and not simply only the ability to swim the fastest or longest.
     
  6. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    12,126
    2,614
    113
    Thanks dp.... You could be right about the swim test's purposes (you said "I think"). I gave up on an exact explanation of what the 4 (5 now) tests are specifically to show. The official descriptions are vague, and the opinions are many and somewhat varied.
     
  7. Scraps

    Scraps Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Florida
    37
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    I don't know if the OP is still looking for advice, but here's the perspective of another DM candidate:

    400 yard swim test: After conducting a self test that would have earned me a 2, I paid for an hour-long session with a swim instructor. He gave me a solid diagnosis of my major form problems, along with worthwhile tips and drills. After the lesson, I practiced my stroke on my own pretty much any time I was in any water for any reason. My stroke got smoother and slower. Getting eyes-on from someone who knew what he was looking at made all the difference. He told me later he knew just from my body type what my problems would be even before I got in the water: muscular guys need to learn not to attack the water. The pros are worth the money. (For the record, he told me not to reach deep on my power stroke.) I just took my test for real last weekend and earned a 4.

    Tired Diver Tow: I practiced different techniques with a buddy and decided to grip the tank valve with my left hand and kick for all I was worth in a side stroke on my right side. My instructor said the key is treating it like a sprint and not pacing yourself. I believed her and went all out. My legs were cramping at the end, but I got a 5 with a few seconds to spare.

    Gear exchange: The keys are 1) establishing breathing routine and communication, 2) going slow. There's no time limit. Just do what you can without hurrying on each breath cycle. You have all day.

    Best wishes,
     
    Graeme Fraser and Rooster59 like this.
  8. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    12,126
    2,614
    113
    On the gear exchange how is it graded? Now that it hasn't been pass/fail for a few years and you say time isn't a factor, I would assume you'd loose marks for bumbling around, making mistakes or having trouble coordinating the buddy breathing?
    Think I've already asked about how you'd grade each person since it is a drill that depends on both doing it correctly.
     
  9. Graeme Fraser

    Graeme Fraser Tech Instructor

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Narnia
    508
    680
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    ^^^^ exactly this ^^^^
     
  10. Scraps

    Scraps Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Florida
    37
    50
    18
    TMHeimer,
    The way it was explained to us was a 5 was for demonstration quality with good teamwork, pacing, and communication. Awkwardness, rushing, and failing to manage smoothly the buoyancy consequences of doffing and donning gear could cost points. Surfacing prematurely would get a DQ.

    We got a 5: the instructor liked our problem solving when I discovered my size 13 foot wouldn't fit in my female partner's fins. I took off my booties, and my partner tucked the discarded booties into her gear while I crammed my bare feet into her fins, then we swapped masks (which we agreed beforehand to do last), and surfaced together.
     

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