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PRO TIP - Regulator service

Discussion in 'Deep 6 Gear' started by cerich, Dec 9, 2019.

  1. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    12,810
    11,804
    113
    One thing to be aware of is that it is highly uncommon for an "immediate failure". The reg will exhibit symptoms that is is time to consider service. Search here on SB (thinking the DIY section) for the "Regulator Checklist". Get an IP gauge, and learn the basics of checking your regulator. Even if you never intend to service it yourself, understanding the symptoms is good practice. You are not doing yourself any favors (aside from filling the cash register) just doing an annual rebuild by an LDS...

    YMMV
     
    markmud and cerich like this.
  2. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Georgia
    6,682
    3,578
    113
    i am comfy with 2 years. I don't feel 3 is "risky" per say provided the IP (intermediate pressure) is stable but at 3 years, a deep clean and service is not a bad thing
     
  3. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Georgia
    6,682
    3,578
    113
    honest answer.. it's literally a roll of the dice.

    For whatever reason, and it has gotten better in the last 15 years or so, there has always been batch variance between HP seats for Diaphragm regs. Some batches are crap and some outstanding. Even when the manuf does nothing different.
     
  4. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Georgia
    6,682
    3,578
    113
    those are called my and Edd's personal regs. Just saying LOL
     
  5. Snodge

    Snodge Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: BC
    17
    7
    3
    Hey Bob, I'd love to read that, can you give a better hint how to find it? I searched on many variations of "Reg checklist" and couldn't find it. If it exists it should be a sticky somewhere.
     
  6. grf88

    grf88 Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Markham, Ontario
    1,595
    1,064
    113
  7. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    12,810
    11,804
    113
    :goodpost:
     
  8. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    3,563
    4,064
    113
    The direction of these questions is a perfect segué into my favorite rant: environmentally sealed first stages.

    If you seal your firsts, and use the Reg Checklist, and check your IP before the first dive of every trip, you can go a nice long time.
    My 1985 SPEC Mk10 is now on year #6. IP 130 and solid. I'm ignoring it for fun, except for a rinse after diving.
    Deep6 diaphragms are sealed. With their Teflon HP o-ring, the only thing I'll be servicing before I see changes on the IP gauge, or a bubble in the environmental diaphragm, will be the second stage.
    'Course, I've got a spare just in case. I bought it for the same cost of a skipped year of service with another manufacturer. :D

    Seconds need a bit more attention, with LP seat aging/indentation. But take the Deep6 course! You can handle that yourself.
     
  9. davehicks

    davehicks Barracuda

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Seattle
    392
    261
    63
    The service interval question is not just one of Time, but of Care as well. If you beat up your gear, don't clean it, or clean it poorly, things will go bad. If you are careful with maintenance then they may last a long time between required service.

    One simple thing that i see ignored more than anything else:

    • Never dive, rinse or soak an unpressurized regulator - both 1st and 2nd's.
    Some will give all sorts of exceptions, etc but just don't do it for best results. Pressurize your regulators before rinsing or submerge them. Hang them up to dry before storage. Buy that IP gauge and test the 1st stage when you starting thinking about service. When you see it start to change over time or go out of spec, it's time.
     
  10. GJC

    GJC Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Southern California, USA
    346
    237
    43
    It depends on:

    How much diving do you do? More dives means more wear on your o rings.

    Do you rinse your regulator well every time after diving? Corrosion is bad.

    Are you meticulous about not getting one drop of water in your regulator? Salt crystals and corrosion will destroy the o rings when they rub against them

    What was the quality and age of the o rings and seats that were replaced the last time it was serviced? The service tech may have used a new manufacturers service kit or 10 year old o rings he had in his box.

    Did the last service tech lube the o rings appropriately and not nick the brass with his picks while removing the old o rings? You're not going to know this unless you do your own servicing.

    If you have a new reg, don't dive a lot and take good care of it, it could last 30 or 40 years before a rubber part deteriorates.

    If you dive a lot or are not good about rinsing and not allowing water to enter your reg, you should at least have it inspected if not serviced every year.
     

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