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Tumbling basics ?

Discussion in 'Tanks, Valves and Bands' started by Bigd2722, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. Bigd2722

    Bigd2722 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Winter Park, fl
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    After filling the tank with media and tumbling it, what's the optimum method to empty the tank? Just did my first tank, it seems holding it upside down and tipping back and forth and adding water to swish out the last little pieces is tedious.

    Suggestions?

    Thanx
     
  2. 1bubbleoff

    1bubbleoff Barracuda

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Midwest
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  3. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
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    what I've found best is to invert and push water into the tank, it keeps the media from binding in the neck. Regular garden hose has worked fine, but you can adapt it down to a nipple *same ones you use to adapt to an air hose to get a bit more pressure. Sorry there isn't a better way that I've found
     
  4. KWS

    KWS ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SE TEXAS
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    buy some hose that is the smallest you can find.. perhaps 1/2 inch thin wall. you can also use copper tubing say 1/4 id and adapt it to a garden hose. you will still have to tip upside down till you get the most out of it. That will take care of the washing out issue. Now getting the stuff out really does not have a fix. Some things that will help is not to use a 1/2 tank of material to tumble with. That should speed up the emptying process. I don't know what the prescribed amount of material is but others may be able to comment on this. Don't forget to rinse with clean non mineral water. Not tap water unless filtered. That will keep the corrosion down. You should seldom ever have to tumble unless you have rust which is probably from bad maintenance or getting bad air. A little anti corrosion spooge mixed in the rinse cant hurt. Remember with every tumble you remove the protective coatings on the inside fo the tank for those that have them like fabar.

    ????? Have you got a copy of "oxygen hackers manual" from airspeed press. its a wonderful book and it should help you along.
     
  5. duckbill

    duckbill Solo Diver

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    I dry tumble. That way I have zero concern about flash rust while farting around trying to get the media out. I can also store the media dry without having to dry it first.

    Then I whip with some cool rinse water in the cylinder to rtemove the dust, and use dry compressed air from a hot cylinder to dry.
     
    Doc Harry likes this.
  6. kwinter

    kwinter Rebreather Pilot

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: South Jersey
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    I have to assume this post is a joke. If so, then haha.
     
  7. duckbill

    duckbill Solo Diver

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    No joke. Been diving a bit deep lately?

    ---------- Post added June 15th, 2015 at 07:32 PM ----------

    Yep. Try dry.
     
  8. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
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    I prefer wet with simple green since you can kill two birds with one stone....
     
  9. kwinter

    kwinter Rebreather Pilot

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: South Jersey
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    Since you seem to be serious, let's break down this nonsense. Flash rust comes from any time the steel gets wet, even if it's only a quick rinse. So dry tumbling will avoid flash rust only if you dump out the tumbling media and then fill the tank with breathing gas without rinsing. That would not be good.
    So after dry tumbling you whip the tank with water. That is the source of flash rust. So the dry tumbling vs wet tumbling makes no difference. And then you say that you use cool water and hot air to dry it. First, I can't imagine where you get hot air from a compressed cylinder. As air expands from compression, it cools. A lot. That's why valves freeze when you drain a tank quickly and why the converse is true and cylinders get hot when you fill them. Plus the fact that getting the tumbled cylinder very hot by using hot water to rinse it will make it dry much faster with the compressed air. That means less exposure time to the air and therefore less flash rust.
    There was not a single point in your post that made sense to me.


    iPhone. iTypo. iApologize.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2015
  10. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
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    I was scratching my head at that one. Was always taught tumble wet with simple green, rinse with basically boiling water, and blow out with dry air. Doesn't matter if it's cold or hot, the pressure drop will make it cold when it comes out...
     

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