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Warmest undergarment available?

Discussion in 'Exposure Suits' started by indigoscratch, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. buddhasummer

    buddhasummer Bat sh.t crazy ScubaBoard Supporter

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    and in a much nicer house/garden than you could afford in Miami too I'd guess.
     
  2. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
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    Your buoyancy counters the negative gear on your back so that is where the pressure is. As the gear presses down along your back it compromises the little insulation that you have.

    Both the 30/30 and the Lavacore seem quite thin. You just may have to resort to more loft in your exposure protection. Add a top with decent loft to what you are diving and test dive it. If that improves things, it will be easier to offer suggestions.
     
  3. Gecko JK

    Gecko JK Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Grand Cayman
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    I use a 4th element dry base to wick any moisture and than have the Halo 3D for warmth. Dive Vancouver island and have yet to complain about cold


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  4. Quero

    Quero Will be missed Rest in Peace ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Makes sense.

    Haven't you told me over and over that cold water only starts at 40°? :D We're talking 60° here, so I really didn't expect to be sooooo cold. Anyway, I'll try wearing a vest or something and see if that helps.
     
    lowviz likes this.
  5. boat sju

    boat sju Loggerhead Turtle

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    Quero,

    I'm not sure exactly what the Lavacore is but looking at their website it looks like it's only a base layer. I would expect you to be freezing.

    I'd suggest you get a polartec sweatshirt and sweatpants and you should be fine. Maybe a 200 wt like this: Crew Neck Fleece Sweatshirt for Men / Bionic Sweatshirt Made of Polartec Fleece -- Orvis Sorry I couldn't find any women's that didn't have a high neck. Be careful of stuff that has a windblock - they can trap air.
     
  6. tracydr

    tracydr Divemaster

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    Quero, if you think you just want a very thin base layer for tropical dry diving, how about smart wool? It soaks up sweat very nicely and stays warm even when damp. Or, Patagonia Capilene.
    I looked at Lavacore and it didn't seem to have any characteristics that would be very desirable under a drysuit, except thinness.
    But,60 degrees is kind of chilly. I'd be wearing a 200-300 wt polar fleece with my Smart Wool base layer.
     
  7. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Yep, but I'll be diving heavy neoprene, Polartecs, polyester, and wool. :D

    60°F (15°C) can be perfectly miserable with inadequate thermal protection...
     
  8. RJP

    RJP Scuba Media & Publications

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    I have a 30/30 and love it... but would never dream of wearing it in water that is 60°F. Water that cold is full-blown dry suit and undergarment range. The 30/30 is a TROPICAL dry suit, made for warm water. It's not made to keep you warm... it's made to keep you dry.

    ---------- Post added October 5th, 2013 at 03:30 PM ----------

    There's no such thing as cold water... only wrong gear.
     
  9. Quero

    Quero Will be missed Rest in Peace ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
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    sju, are you suggesting Polartec instead of Lavacore? Or in addition? I don't want to add thickness, just warmth. Do the polartec ones have windblock?

    ---------- Post added October 6th, 2013 at 04:18 AM ----------

    The people here seem to think differently. Most of them are diving wet in single-layer 5 or 7 mm! I'm feeling distinctly wuss-y, LOL. I'll try adding a vest, and if that doesn't work, maybe I'll just have to go back to a 5 mm farmer jane.
     
  10. Kevrumbo

    Kevrumbo Banned

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
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    I never like "stewing" in my own sweat, even in my undergarments here in temperate SoCal homewaters. So I don't understand why anyone would want to wear a drysuit in tropical warm waters of 28deg C or more.

    You're in the tropics people --diving wet immersion in a skinsuit is a luxury to be enjoyed!
     

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