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Books on History of Diving.

Discussion in 'History of Scuba Diving: Tales from the Abyss' started by compressor, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. compressor

    compressor ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Northeast USA
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    I appreciate all the various suggestions given so far. This will become a sought after thread in my opinion thanks to all your efforts.
     
  2. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
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    The National Geographic Society has an old book, titled World Beneath the Sea, by James Dugan, Robert C. Cowen, Bill Barada, Luis Marden, and Richard M. Crim from 1967 which is very well illustrated, and has chapters on:

    1. Exploring the Ocean World
    2. Man Invades the Sea
    3. Revealing the Ocean's Secrets
    4. Diving for Sport and for Science
    5. Cameras Below
    6. The Sea's Dark Museum
    7. Taxis to the Deep
    8. Harvests of the Future
    9. Homes in the Sea

    Colorfully laid out, with many photos and illustrations, it would be a great addition to any diver's library. I beleive it is out of print, is available used through Amazon for a nominal price. Take a look at page 22 for a photo of a cryogenic lung:
    It also goes through a history of diving, submersibles, and living under the sea, with photos of Sealab and of Conshelf experiments, as well as Edwin Link's SPID (submersible portable inflatable dwelling).

    SeaRat
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2017
  3. adrielnicholas

    adrielnicholas Garibaldi

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    Interested divers can gain immensely from books on history of diving. They can learn about the safety practices for scuba diving and make appropriate personal choices such as, ensuring the diving mask chosen fits you right.
     
    David Wilson likes this.
  4. David Wilson

    David Wilson Manta Ray

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    Your comment about mask fitting reminds me of a prized tome in the Russian-language section of my diving literature bookcase:

    P. P. Serebrenitsky (1969) Техника подводного спорта (Lenizdat).
    il_570xN.1416390915_7f56.jpg
    The title of this 462-page profusely illustrated Soviet diving book can be rendered into English as "Underwater sports technology" or "Underwater sports equipment". The author devised the following method for comparative evaluation of diving masks (my translation):
    measurements-jpg.409694.jpg
    measurement_2-jpg.409695.jpg
    The offerings above are truly remarkable, considering how the book was published as long ago as 1969. There can be few better examples of an 8-model mask round-up, covering as it does not only mask and lens dimensions but also angles of horizontal and vertical fields of vision. Here in the west, we bandy around terms such as "low-volume" without supplying for comparative purposes the exact cubic capacity of the mask interior, while our mask manufacturers neglect to provide even the most basic skirt measurements that would help us have an inkling at least whether a particular mask is likely to match the profiles of our faces or not.

    What is more, a huge illustrated extract from Serebrenitsky's book is available without charge online at Маски (полумаски, очки), дыхательные трубки, ласты. The text can be run through Google Translate for a rough rendering into English. There are very few books like this, in any language, wholly dedicated to underwater swimming equipment and this Russian title is one of the best. Serebrenitsky's comparative study of Russian and Ukrainian swim fins marketed during the 1960s is equally thorough, detailing the negative as well as the positive features of each model.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2018
    Schwob, Akimbo and Sam Miller III like this.

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