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Can I use a single wing for doubles?

Discussion in 'Buoyancy Compensators (BC's) and Weight Systems' started by bigred177, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

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    By definition almost all inquires concerning the use of One wing for singles and doubles see on internet forums are being made by divers who have not yet used or purchased any Back Plate and wing. (You just don't see this type question from those who are well versed in BP&W, they know better)

    The factors that influence the choice of a wing for either singles or doubles are primarily:

    The buoyancy of the diver's exposure suit.

    The volume of the tank(s)

    It is extremely rare in my experience that a diver who is about to buy their first BP&W already knows what they will be using for an exposure suit when (or if) they transition to doubles. The holds true for tanks, few of these divers have any idea what tanks they might be using when they move to doubles.

    Most divers will not be using the same exposure protection doubles dives that very likely include greater depths and lower water temps and much longer runtimes than they are currently experiencing with recreational single tanks.

    In short these divers simply are not equipped to select a doubles wing.

    Now look at the reasons Divers are attracted to BP&W's in the first place. Chief amongst these is reduced clutter and drag, and better venting performance.

    Selecting a wing that is potentially 2x or more larger than is required for single tank diving, in a misplaced effort to be "prepared" for doubles "down the road" will negate many of the advantages offered by a properly sized, streamlined, single tank only BP&W.

    If one does eventually make the transition to doubles the single wing can of course be sold and the proceeds used to buy the correct doubles wing, once the diver knows what his exposure suit buoyancy is and what cylinders he will be using. Net cost of about $150-200.

    The transition to doubles is expensive, typically involves a drysuit, a couple sets of doubles, deco bottles, 4-8 sets of regs, can light, training and a few $1000's worth of misc gear.

    To "hamstring" the new to BP&W diver with a "do it all" wing to save a few $$ is just silly.

    Tobin
     
  2. RAWalker

    RAWalker Divemaster

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    Not all divers that dive BP&W aspire to be tech divers!!!

     
  3. Gombessa

    Gombessa DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: NorCal
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    But most of the ones who are concerned about getting a wing that will let them transition into doubles, are.
     
  4. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

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    Then they should buy a nice singles wing and go diving.

    Tobin
     
  5. Jasonmh

    Jasonmh ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: New Mexico
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    I am in Albuquerque. If you want to join us at Blue Hole sometime, I have 2 doubles wings that I would be happy to let you try out. I try to go about once a month just to stay in practice. You might also want to check out the Rocky Mountain Oyster group... a good place to find a buddy for the BH.
     
  6. foles1972

    foles1972 Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cape Cod, MA
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    Well, this has been a very entertaining debate! I honestly understand both sides of the arguement.

    However...I am going to have to tell a couple friends of mine (one in particular who has been tech diving since before "tech diving" was a term) that he has been doing it all wrong (for the last 20-30 years), and using the wrong wing when he does it! :)
     
  7. RAWalker

    RAWalker Divemaster

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    Hmm seems to me that many may already have an array of wetsuits. Myself I have from a shortie to a 7mm.
    I dive both fresh and saltwater.
    I dive all year logging dives from 49*F to tropical conditions.
    Selecting a bungied wing with 45# of lift rated by it's manufacturer to handle both singles and doubles has been an effective choice for me as it may be for others.
    I thought having a BCD that is well secured to me without producing a squeezing effect at the surface and the inherent excellent buoyancy and trim characteristics of the BP&W were the chief reasons. Also modular construction adds to the versatility for future expansion of my diving horisons. Clutter and drag, maybe that is more important to others. Especially those diving drysuits since the drysuit may produce more drag to begin with.
    I still feel there are some advantages that are worth while. (see above) I'm sure a number of other divers that have made similar choices also do.
    But the dual purpose single/double wing doesn't need to be sold (usually losing some value along the way) It remains a part of my equipment locker for use whenever it is the best solution available to me for the dive I'm planing.
    There are plenty of divers that dive double wet in warm water for extra bottom time. Why lump a drysuit, DECO bottles or can lights into the mix? It isn't a requirement for doubles. Many divers may use doubles well within recreational limits and this helps to further keep the cost within a relm that many of us can afford to express interest in. We don't all aspire to be Tech, wreck or cave divers.
    Although your approach is well thought out and correct for a large number of divers it does not fit everyone. Some divers may find the other approach more useful to them.

    So here is a question for you...
    If you had to make a choice of one wing to use for both single tank and doubles what would the wing and tank choice be to maximize your ability to dive within standard recreational limits of 130' without any overhead obstruction?
    Please address the answer for both wetsuit and drysuit separately.
    Only considering wings that are currently available for public purchase.
     
  8. JeffG

    JeffG Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Edmonton, Alberta
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    I would pick Taylormade.
     
  9. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

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    Your premise is rather odd. Why not demand that I select one set of clothes for the rest of my life?

    Nothing forces me, or any other diver to choose one wing for all conditions. That you choose this route does not compel me or anyone else to make the same mistake.

    Every diver has the option to just stay out of the water if they lack, for whatever reason, the appropriate gear.

    Tobin
     
  10. foles1972

    foles1972 Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cape Cod, MA
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    If he has a wing that works for him why is it a mistake or inappropriate? Because it's not what you are trying to sell?

    (I don't mean any disrespect...I know you sell great equipment, and everyone here has great things to say about you and your customer service!)
     

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