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How to get warm in 57-degree Fahrenheit water

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba' started by FPDocMatt, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. Garth

    Garth Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: North Carolina USA
    1,055
    143
    This thread is titled wrong. It should be " how to stay warm in 57 degree water."

    First be warm then stay warm and that would require staying dry and using undergarments.
     
  2. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,599
    819
    If the water temperature is below 75 degrees F then I am in a dry suit.
     
  3. Nitro91

    Nitro91 Contributor

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Sydney, Australia
    292
    10
    That is crazy... 60F just means a 5/4mm suit plus 1.5mm shorty with hood gloves and boots. No problems there.
     
  4. FPDocMatt

    FPDocMatt Contributor

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Middletown, Maryland, USA
    446
    197
    Is diving in a dry suit in cold water as much fun as diving in a wet suit in warm water? That is, is a dry suit uncomfortable, cumbersome, unpleasant to wear? I read over the dry suit chapter of the adventure diving manual, and I got the impression that dry suits are a bit of a pain.
     
  5. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,599
    819
    You mean is diving dry, warm and comfortable as much fun as diving wet, cold and miserable?
     
  6. FPDocMatt

    FPDocMatt Contributor

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Middletown, Maryland, USA
    446
    197
    No, I mean is diving dry, warm and comfortable in cold water as much fun as diving, wet, warm and comfortable in warm water. You might want to reread my question.
     
  7. scubajim 1

    scubajim 1 Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: St Lucie County Florida
    577
    445
    Yes Matt it is as much fun and even in warm water you will be able to dive more often and longer because your core temp won't drop as much. You will have plenty of energy after the dives because your body didn't spend it keeping your core warm.
     
  8. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,599
    819
    I'm just making a joke. :)

    It all depends on what you mean by "warm water." Some people may call 75-degree water "warm."

    But if I am doing 3 to 4 dives a day for a week, 75-degree water gets to be pretty darn cold. So if I am doing one or two dives, I might consider a wetsuit under those conditions. But if I am going diving for a week, I will dive dry.

    Also the weather plays a big role. If it is sunny and 85 degrees then I might dive wet. But if the forecast is for wind and rain, then I will defintiely be diving dry in 75 degree water.

    I went diving in the Florida Keys last winter. The water was 78 degrees, and everyone on the boat made fun of me for wearing a dry suit. But half of the divers on the boat skipped the second dive because they came up from the first dive shivering.

    Your personal thermoregulation and body make-up is another factor. When I go diving in Cozumel for a week (80-degree water) I will dive in a 5mm because the repetetive diving really wears you down, and I get really cold on the 4th dive of the day. As you known being cold predisposes you to decompression illness, so I really avoid getting cold at all if I am pursuing aggressive, repetitive dive schedules.

    And I've never been bent.

    A dry suit is just a comfortable as a wet suit - even more so, because you're WARM.
     
    scubajim 1 likes this.
  9. farsidefan1

    farsidefan1 Contributor Rest in Peace

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA
    1,293
    163
    My solution? add an equal amount of 107 degree water and wait till it evens out at about 82 degrees. If that isn't practical go diving somewhere that he water is already near desired temperature. Really, this works! Well, the second part anyway.
     
  10. FPDocMatt

    FPDocMatt Contributor

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Middletown, Maryland, USA
    446
    197
    Okay, then I'll seriously consider getting one.
     

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