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Long term problems after diving

Discussion in 'Diving Medicine' started by Julia Benedetti, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. Kevrumbo

    Kevrumbo Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: South Santa Monica Bay/Los Angeles California, USA
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    Julia Benedetti likes this.
  2. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Julia, this is an interesting symptom set. Have you seen a GI specialist?

    Best regards,
    DDM
     
  3. Julia Benedetti

    Julia Benedetti Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: California
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    No, I haven't. I didn't think of that. I'll ask my gp for a referral. Thank you
     
  4. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    You're most welcome. Given your symptom presentation I wondered if maybe you'd damaged something when violently seasick.

    Best regards,
    DDM
     
    Julia Benedetti likes this.
  5. laikabear

    laikabear Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Pasadena, CA
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    What imaging have you had?
     
    Julia Benedetti likes this.
  6. Julia Benedetti

    Julia Benedetti Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: California
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    Chest x-ray, chest CT, brain MRI, heart ultrasound. My gp mostly just asks what I want, doesn't really help me out with research, so I would love suggestions on what to look for. At the beginning I was sure there must be a bubble in my chest because of the pain. But now I am much more concerned with the fact that any change in altitude and my brain is having severe problems.
     
  7. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    Julia,

    This is speculation based on what you posted previously and only one possibility, but it's not out of the question that you suffered damage to your stomach and/or esophagus when you were vomiting. Both branches of the vagus nerve wrap around the esophagus; I wonder if there could be some interaction there. The vagus nerve has a lot of functions, but if it's stimulated it can slow down your heart rate and drop your blood pressure. If you had an air pocket in your stomach or esophagus that expanded on ascent to altitude in an airplane, it could theoretically stimulate the vagus nerve in a damaged area. It would be something to ask a GI specialist and/or a neurologist about.

    Best regards,
    DDM
     
    Julia Benedetti likes this.

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