• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Spin Off: Do you refuse to dive with a DM/quide in a new location?

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Teamcasa, Jul 22, 2008.

Use of a DM/guide on new locations

  1. I follow the charters rules.

    64.0%
  2. I don’t use charters that require me to dive with their guides.

    8.6%
  3. I talk to the charter and ask to dive (w/buddy) apart from the guide.

    20.1%
  4. Once I hit the water, I do what I want.

    3.6%
  5. I only dive with DM/guides (new locations).

    13.7%
  6. I try to annoy/prove to the DM/guide that I don’t need their help.

    0.7%
  7. I never travel to exotic dive locations. Local Diving Only.

    2.9%
  8. I dive solo.

    5.0%
  1. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

    18,583
    337
    83
    On every dive there are things you see and things you miss. You cannot see it all. When the rest of the group follows the guide, they often say something like, "You should have gone with us, the DM showed us a Seahorse." My reply, "Very nice, did you see the Caribbean Reef Shark?" On every dive, I'll see things you miss and you'll see things I miss, even when we are diving together. I'm not as keen to see the things the DM wants to point out as he is to point them out. A French Angel is beautiful, but I don't need a guide to point them out, I've seen thousands. I'd much rather relax and enjoy the dive with my buddy at our pace, go where we want to go, follow up on what catches our attention than to follow a baby sitter who want to show me Sanddivers, Seahorses and Angelfish while missing the cool Hamlets and Brittlestars.
     
  2. Boxcar Overkill

    Boxcar Overkill Barracuda

    295
    2
    0
    Sorry, I've never dived outside of these little islands. That means guided dives out on the reefs, and guide-less when my friends and I do the wrecks.

    There's no recall system used here, that I'm aware of. Nor would a helicopter come get anyone out on the reefs. I don't think another boat in the area could be contacted to come and get floating divers because the only other boats in the area would be waiting on their divers who are also underwater.

    So maybe things are different in the U.S., I've never dived there. Is the recall system any good? Have you personally experienced it, such that you know how far from the boat you can be and still get the signal?
     
  3. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

    18,583
    337
    83
    A recall signal can be underwater speakers connected to a mike through which the captain tells the divers to return to the boat or it can simply be revving the engine or hitting the ladder with a lead weight. As long as the divers understand the system it will work. Sound travels very nicely underwater. I've heard simple sytems in use as well as fancy ones, they are all very effective.
     
  4. String

    String Master Instructor

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Grand Cayman
    8,509
    365
    83
    Found revving engine particularly useless if wearing a hood and deep. Plus in areas with lots of other boat traffic.
    Here as well 100% of dive boats are "live" so the engines are running all the time and its impossible to pick out an engine rev from someone simply accelerating, trying to start and so on.

    Ladder banging again, depth, hood and distance makes it very hard move than 50m away.

    Thunderflash DO work but they're rare to see (as long as you're careful where you drop them).
     
  5. Gilldiver

    Gilldiver Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Northeast US
    1,770
    139
    63
    Just remember, the Dive Master may be evaluating you, but you should also be evaluating them as well.
     
  6. sea nmf

    sea nmf Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Honolulu, HI
    1,847
    0
    0
    I try to follow the rules. That being said, my buddy team lags behind the group quite a bit, as we go slow.

    Many charters have schedules to keep. That is why they set time limits. They also don't want to have to corral everyone. I see their point from a business point of view. I don't like it, but I'll stay within sight, usually. But I will be waaayyy behind the group.
     
  7. BabyDuck

    BabyDuck Rebreather Pilot

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Winterville, NC
    5,614
    430
    83
    i didn't vote, so here's my reply -

    i'd be thrilled to dive with a dm/guide who was showing me stuff while letting me do my thing in a new place.

    i'd be insulted if i felt they were insisting on running my dive for me or making me hold their hand, and that would be reeeeeally hard for me to take - i'd be very angry.
     
  8. RJP

    RJP Scuba Media & Publications

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New Jersey
    13,460
    6,053
    113
    Also problematic in anyplace other than nice, calm water, since the ladder is typically banging most of the time!
     
  9. RikRaeder

    RikRaeder Photographer

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Oakland, Ca
    744
    13
    18
    I've noticed that most guides don't exactly attach a three meter tether to the divers in their group. If you stay in the vicinity for a couple of dives and let them see that you are able (if indeed you are), you don't have to put your nose up their bum on the subsequent dives (I mean follow too closely). I find that as long as I'm within sight, with my buddy, and can see them if they signal me I get plenty of leeway. Of course I usually dive in 40m, 50m, or sometimes even greater visability, so that's a pretty long "leash." As others have stated, not my boat...not my rules.
    If I swim off and get myself killed, it's the charter company that is going to be attacked by a pack of lawyers. Also, a good DM who takes their job seriously will accept responsibility for the divers in their charge, so why stress the DM out by disappearing. Seems rather juvenile to me. You're off enjoying your dive, and the DM is freaked because some of their group has disappeared. If you can make arrangements with the guide or company before, why not? Just to disappear on the dive; very selfish.
    Were I to come to your place of business, or to your home and simply do things my way which possibly opened you up to legal liability, stress, and was just contrary to what you wanted would that be cool?
     
  10. Alex777

    Alex777 Divemaster

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Britannia, Grand Cayman
    1,147
    58
    48
    I realize that this makes me a selfish a**hole, but I expect to just hop in the water and do my dive, my way. A big part of diving a site is the fun of going new places, finding a new swim-thru, etc. The last thing I want to do is follow someone else around. Hopefully, I will have acquired a buddy who shares my attitude but, if not, there's always my trusty pony bottle ...

    I would never "just disappear" on the dive. I only go with dive ops who let you do your own thing, and I make that clear in advance.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2008

Share This Page