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Yellow Sponge or Egg Mass?

Discussion in 'Name that Critter' started by scubadiverjackcook, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. scubadiverjackcook

    scubadiverjackcook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Southern California
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    I took this shot at Anacapa Island last Saturday on the backside at the sea lion colony. It was in about 25 feet of water and attached to a large rock. Is it a type of sponge, or is it an egg mass. I am told that someone else saw the same thing at Point Dume on the same day.
    It was about 4 inches by 2 inches and had ribs that seemed to be filled with fine sand.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Jim Greenfield

    Jim Greenfield Angel Fish

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    Nudibranch eggs - don't know which nudi though
     
  3. Bubbletrubble

    Bubbletrubble Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Seussville
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    Definitely nudibranch eggs.
    Looks like the eggs of Peltodoris nobilis to me.
    Here's a link to a Sea Slug Forum pic of the nudi and its eggs.

    Did you see any of those Noble dorids in the vicinity?
    I've seen this species all over SoCal. Hard to miss since they're big and yellow with dark pigment not on the tubercles.
     
  4. scubadiverjackcook

    scubadiverjackcook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Southern California
    29
    0
    1
    Thanks. I didn't see any Peltodoris nobilis on my dives that day, but I have seen a lot of them lately everywhere from sandy bottoms in Newport Beach to rocky outcrops at Long Point. They seem to be pretty ubiquitous.
     

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