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12 boys lost in flooded Thai cave

Discussion in 'Search & Rescue' started by Dogbowl, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. taimen

    taimen Rebreather Pilot

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Europe
    847
    429
    Altamira, Dogbowl, Lizolett and 2 others like this.
  2. taimen

    taimen Rebreather Pilot

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Europe
    847
    429
    No statistics, but at least Mikko Paasi posted in fb that he was using his sidemount SF-2 for the rescue dives. He is an SF-2 instructor.
     
    shoredivr and chillyinCanada like this.
  3. Greenjuice

    Greenjuice Contributor

    134
    64
    My non-expert attempt to comment on your questions, in order:
    By my reading of events, the current flow was generally towards the exit of the cave. Entries were taking longer than exits. The route of rescue was the same after pumping, but with less water and more walking. They came out the same route as the one they went in (initially when it was dry).
     
    ReefieRN likes this.
  4. Greenjuice

    Greenjuice Contributor

    134
    64
    Have a look at the sketch on Page 7, Post #68.
    I believe it was sketched by one of the rescue team members asking for wider assistance, after emerging from one of the initial explorations. Not sure if 'above' is the right way to describe it.
     
    ReefieRN likes this.
  5. SailorJoe

    SailorJoe Registered

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: US
    38
    51
    Remember the boys did not have rebreathers. Some of the rescue team did. Anybody without a rebreather would need to re-supply air in/out of the tunnel.
     
    ScubaToneDog likes this.
  6. ScubaToneDog

    ScubaToneDog Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cleveland Ohio
    252
    60
    Yup. In divers its Immersion Pulmonary Edema (IPE). DAN has some research on it. Some articles I've read attribute cold water, over-hydration and supplements high in omega 3 fatty acids to IPE in young healthy individuals (heart meds, cardiovascular disease and obesity affects the out of shape people).

    Best part is, everyone is out with no more injuries!
     
  7. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
    6,998
    4,547
    Yes. From what I understand the group went in the cave before heavy rains started (unusually early in monsoon season which was supposed to start in July). Then they noticed ground water started to seep in by rising water table. The coach has been in the cave before so he knew where the high ground in the cave. They had to pass through the restriction, which was still dry at the time.

    The restriction may not be much above them. It could be down & up like a “U” shape. The only way to get to the higher ground is by going through the restriction before turning into a water-filled sump.

    BTW it’s not h20, it’s H2O or just simply type water.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
  8. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
    6,998
    4,547
    I think there’s only one route to get there. The only difference is before the route was dry and after the heavy downpour rain, some low lying section of the same route were flooded.

    Water current goes from high to low ground. There are several high & low grounds in the cave. There are some in-passable (too small for a human to go through) branches of the cave where the rain water can enter & exit, as shown, below. Some of the rescue divers mentioned in the early part of the rescue period that the current was towards the entrance. That’s why it took them longer to go in than out. However, later on when the rain stopped & a lot of water was being pumped out, they didn’t mention about water current being problematic anymore.

    D5777B99-918F-4253-B0F8-AB4848A17B4A.jpeg
    962A3F96-B3C6-40FF-85E9-4A13DB6AA6E0.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
    Schwob and ReefieRN like this.
  9. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
    26,991
    20,003
    When I was a teenager, I was part of a group that participated in a variety of outdoor adventures. In one of them, we entered and were guided through a non-commercial cave on private property. We got very far into it. We first had to wiggle through a tunnel through which we barely fit. We slid through a crack in a rocky section. We used a wire ladder to climb down a waterfall. With no training or cave experience whatsoever, we made our way through a number of places which would have been nearly impossible to pass through if it were flooded and we were wearing scuba equipment.

    I have no information on how the team got to where they were, but it does not surprise me in the least that they were there. They could have gone there completely on their own with very little effort and then been trapped by the rising water when they began their return.
     
    Cowfish Aesthetic and ReefieRN like this.
  10. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
    6,998
    4,547
    What are all these sentiments towards American for? Have you heard any of them bragged about what they have done in this mission?
     
    scuba andy likes this.

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