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Brain fog during and after deep(ish) /multiple dives

Discussion in 'Diving Medicine' started by MykaDives, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. MykaDives

    MykaDives DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SK, Canada
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    So there is really nothing I can do? :)
     
  2. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
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    Maybe get a medical evaluation to make sure that nothing else is going on... Any ear symptoms? Ear pain, hearing loss, balance issue?

    Sorry, not sure what to tell you, but preventing hypercapnea is a good goal in any type of diving. Check out this article by John Chatterton.
     
    MykaDives, Blueringocto_73 and HKGuns like this.
  3. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    Based on your description that the symptoms begin at pressure on both single dives and repetitive dives, I think that decompression illness can probably be ruled out. What's your air consumption like? My first thought is a combination of narcosis and mild hypercapnia, but tunnel vision can be a symptom of hyperventilation as well.

    Best regards,
    DDM
     
    Blueringocto_73 and flyboy08 like this.
  4. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
    6,120
    5,507
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    Sometimes hyperventilation causes hypercapnea because of increased dead space ventilation as a percentage of tidal volume. It's a confusing symptom complex and I don't understand why narcosis (80 feet?) or hypercapnia symptoms would persist for hours after the dive.

    If it really presents immediately on reaching depth on the first dive of a trip, then I agree that decompression stress is probably not what is causing THAT, but it might be what is causing his symptoms to worsen with repetitive dives or days of diving. Or, whatever is going on on the first dive is a different process than what is causing symptoms after the dive.

    In any case, as always, I defer to you in the field of hyperbaric medicine!
     
    Blueringocto_73 and MykaDives like this.
  5. MykaDives

    MykaDives DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SK, Canada
    62
    35
    18
    Well, I didn't want to mention it, because I figured you guys would be off the rails pronto, but I do have chronic vertigo (all day, everyday, for about 10 years). The reason I don't think the vertigo is related is because it is not an inner ear issue, but a visual sensitivity.

    I was also diagnosed with asthma when I was about 12. I'm not sure that was ever an accurate diagnosis because there was no test performed - was simply, "You cough when you run in cold air, and your mom has asthma? You have asthma too, here's your inhaler." Speaking with my mom, she's actually not sure if her own asthma diagnosis is corret either. There has never been a time when I thought I HAD to use the Salbutamol inhaler, and currently they are all expired by several years. They help relieve chest congestion more than anything. On my list of things to do is to actually get asthma testing. What I find "most irritating asthma-like symptoms" is exercise in cold weather (like running below freezing temps), and MAYBE breathing cold air from a cylinder is causing some irritation and mild asthma is causing hypercapnea? I was kind of waiting to see what people would come up with before I presented this information. :D

    Thanks for your reply DDM, air consumption is pretty good. I am female, 5'7", 130lbs. If I concentrate on air consumption I can usually "under breathe" the small male instructors with thousands of dives. If I'm not specifically thinking about air consumption, then I will use a bit more.
     
    Blueringocto_73 likes this.
  6. Ghost95

    Ghost95 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Florida
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    Any chance you're using a full face mask? The only time I've ever had weird issues I was using an old style mask without the oral/nasal cup. I feel I built up Co2 in the mask. I was very relaxed and crawling around the bottom with just little breaths through my nose. I got kind of buzzy, foggy, sparkles in my vision, not fun.

    Other ideas, cardiac workup good? Suit too tight around your neck?

    Wait, What? Asthma? Visual Vertigo?

    I'd get a medical clearance before doing anything else.
     
    Lostdiver71 likes this.
  7. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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    How's your back and neck?
     
  8. MykaDives

    MykaDives DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SK, Canada
    62
    35
    18
    No full face mask. Cardiac is fine as far as I know, I'm 37, female, good weight, healthy lifestyle. I've had medical clearance for diving all along since I needed clearance for asthma to do the ciurss, and redo every 2 years.

    I hold a class 1 license (semi trucks), and they haven't taken that away because of vertigo.

    No known issues.
     
  9. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

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    Seem like something it getting pinched or compressed. The pin point vision, did you also feel like you might pass out?
     
  10. Ghost95

    Ghost95 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Florida
    150
    77
    28
    Myka, just wanted to be the first off the rails and get it out of the way:D.

    I asked about cardiac work up because at 41 I had a heart stent for a 100% blockage. Symptom free until 3 months or so before stress test. No heart damage and stents now have good flow. Cleared for diving by Doc after stress/treadmill tests.:thumb:

    The only thing I can think of causing tunnel vision is reduced circulation or high Co2 but there may be many other explanations I've never heard of.

    I'd still get another medical focused on diving. The tunnel vision would bug me nonstop.

    I hope you get it figured out. Be safe.
     
    MykaDives likes this.

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