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Emergency Equipment to Assist Search and Rescue

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba' started by IyaDiver, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. IyaDiver

    IyaDiver Contributor

    # of Dives:
    Location: Indonesia
    198
    49
    Poor soul those divers...:(

    2 days prior to the Sanglaki misfortune, there was a rental fishing ( recreational ) boat which sank and lost all its 11 anglers.
    This is in the Indian Ocean side of Sunda Straight. One of them is an uncle of my friend. Such a tragedy at sea too.

    Anyway, I just want to share something with you guys.
    A personal rescue device called AIS SART. Its size and price has shrank like EPIRB to a PLB.
    Previous to this it was only SART and it was radar based. Big and expensive.

    SART
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_rescue_transponder
    SART

    AIS SART
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIS-SART

    This is a 60 meter depth rated AIS SART
    Smartfind S10

    This is another one :
    A040-DP easyRESCUE-DIVEpro - Weatherdock English
    And its receiving display system
    http://www.easyais.com/en/products/easyinfobox-a053/
    The above is very much like ENOS diver rescue system.
    ENOS and the above is expensive for its receiving display.


    AIS system for big ship has been around 10+ years and now it becomes a rescue technology for MOB ( Man Over Board ) and drifting divers too. Now AIS SART beacon is cheap.


    If anyone know ENOS diver rescue system, I am sure ENOS is using similar system to AIS-SART but, on a custom basis and within its own eco system.
    http://www.seareq.de/en/products/enos


    Picture this AIS SART as DSC, same concept, transmit "text" data over marine VHF, but AIS is more "monitored" so to speak.


    You can copy ENOS system ( or that WeatherDock ) by making the receiver and display system as portable, and use that McMurdo S10 AIS SART as diver beacon.
    I can only find one manufacturer which has integrated AIS receiver in their chartplotter
    http://www.onwamarine.com/kp-6299a-kp-6299b/
    Other big brands require a dedicated AIS blackbox/reciever and a chartplotter.

    Get a Pelican bag, a 12V small SLA battery of 7 amps hour, a Shakespeare emergency VHF antena ( small and short ), some PVC piping as antenas base, you get a lower cost ENOS equivalent. This set up should last for 8 hours portable operation or 4 dives.



    I just emailed Onwa asking if their unit is ready for the AIS SART message protocol, which is quite new and dedicated for AIS SART, so that alarm and proper symbol can be triggered on the chartplotter when receiving the distress signal. I think it is AIS SART ready, as they also sell/make AIS SART beacon, copying McMurdo one ... LOL.

    There is another low cost AIS display candidate but you will need active GPS antena data feed and it is not a chartplotter.
    http://www.nasamarine.com/proddetail.php?prod=AIS_radar

    Upgrade the chip to be AIS SART ready
    http://www.nasamarine.com/proddetail.php?prod=RADARUPGRADECHIP


    Overall, nothing beats the simplicity of hanging a marine VHF on a crew neck and diver carry one too ( IPX7 rated ) in a dive cannister. This is the fastest response, and you can confirm transmission reception.

    Dive safe ..........

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 31, 2015
  2. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
    50,456
    5,577
  3. HDVdiver

    HDVdiver Registered

    # of Dives:
    Location: Adelaide, Australia
    12
    11
    This is absolutely not true! Why are you pushing a "rescue system" that at best would be of limited range use on a very well organized/funded dive boat such as a top class liveaboard. Even then the range of these UHF or VHF systems is basically line of sight...10 km or so. Such a "device" would most likely not help these divers in the slightest.

    Do you seriously think that most small day dive boats in Indonesia and other Third world countries are going to have a SART receiver aboard? A SART transponder MIGHT help during the Search and Rescue phase when a variety of vessels and aircraft are deployed...but that's yet another big IF.

    Much cheaper and simpler technology has been available for many years...the GPS/PLB. The tiny device can be taken underwater by the diver in a pressure proof canister (several brands cheaply available) and activated on the surface in the event of an emergency. The signal is picked up by satellites of the Global Cospas-Sarsat monitoring network...within minutes they know who you are (from pre-registration) and where you are to an accuracy of a few METRES! Thus, for about $400 the diver has complete responsibility for his/her own safety.

    Absolutely no dependence on the competence of any dive boat crew or the boat's equipment...ever...anywhere!

    Totally bypasses any reliance on any boats possibly picking up a short range UHF/VHF radio signal! No reliance on a random Search and Rescue effort...of varying efficiency and motivation depending on who the local authorities are. A PLB activated anywhere on the surface of the planet will have its signal picked up by satellites (PLBs transmit for a minimum of 24 hours). Cospas-Sarsat then notify the local rescue authorities exactly where the diver is (the signal transmits updated GPS data constantly)...and make sure that the local authorities rescue the lost diver.

    If even one of the lost European divers had a PLB they would still be alive today. I have absolutely no doubt about that.

    The sooner divers take responsibility for their own surface safety by always carrying a PLB the sooner there will no longer be loss of life due to "divers lost at sea" incidents. Due to the nature of the sport such incidents will continue to occasionally happen...it's up to us to make sure we are prepared to save ourselves using cheap and simple EPIRB/PLB technology if it ever happens to us.
     
    Scuba_Jenny and Wingy like this.
  4. Scuba_Jenny

    Scuba_Jenny dirty-finned dive goddess ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Hollywood, Florida
    29,081
    14,478
    YES! THIS!!! Why spend the money on a SART when you can get a PLB that has a GPS system embedded, and when activated, rescue is notified in minutes?


    The AIS SART, is is waterproof? My understanding is that it only works with an AIS system. Commercial ships have an AIS system, but smaller boats won't.
     
  5. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
    50,456
    5,577
    Well, I thought the SART looked promising, and it does says it's waterproof to 60 meters as originally stated above, but yeah - I like my PLB. There are limits to both, Search & Rescue may not be efficient in some areas for the PLB, but the PLB seems most beneficial overall. I do not leave my house without mine. It rides in my car wherever I go, until I get out - then often rides in my pack.
     
  6. Scuba_Jenny

    Scuba_Jenny dirty-finned dive goddess ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Hollywood, Florida
    29,081
    14,478
    The SART does not search and rescue globally.. the PLB /EPIRB ( for boats) is global.

    I've been out of the loop for a while, but it used to be that the SART worked on the 121.5 technology, while still around, is no longer monitored by the Coast Guard. PLB/EPIRBs use 406 MHz and include GPS information with the transmission.. Most other devices just don't match the power of a PLB though may have bells and whistles.
    With the registration of the PLB/EPIRB you can do (free) updates with personal details.. say you are taking your PLB hiking in the mountains. Update the registration. Next week you are diving with 3 friends. Update the info to include your friends and itinerary. When S&R gets the GPS transmission they will know it's not an accidental activation.
     
  7. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

    3,030
    1,538
    The drawback is that you need a dive canister for every plb I've seen. Which cost as much or more than the plb itself and makes it much bigger.
     
  8. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
    50,456
    5,577
    Yeah, I own an ACR 2881, but rent the canister - and it is a bit bulky, heavy on land, not sure if it's buoyant in water. If I didn't already own one, I'd get this one: http://www.landfallnavigation.com/r...m_medium=shopping+engine&utm_campaign=froogle - even smaller. It does have to be carried in the neoprene pouch to be buoyant, and I am not sure if the unit & pouch would fit inside the smaller, cheaper canisters available. I did email the company to ask, but they couldn't suggest a canister. I may have caught customer service on a bad day.
     
  9. Scuba_Jenny

    Scuba_Jenny dirty-finned dive goddess ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Hollywood, Florida
    29,081
    14,478
    personally, I would stay with ACR... but that's personal .. LOL.. I would think an old can light would work as a canister. Or an old camera housing..
     
  10. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
    50,456
    5,577
    ACR makes a fine one, but their customer service sucks too. Sometimes I just have to follow directions. I got my ACR 2881 for $200 after rebate, and if I ever have to use it - they'll replace the battery for free with a good rescue story, which they use in advertising. I think 8 out of 9 alerts are mistakes, but I carry mine in a good pouch that prevents accidental activation.

    The Ocean Signal PLB1 is so much smaller tho, so a person is more likely to carry it, diving, hiking, boating, etc. Costs some more @ $259 (an up if you're not careful, maybe $359 at some sites!), but the standby battery is good 2 years longer than on ACR's. If I didn't own a PLB, I'd get it and find a canister - a camera housing might work? Hard to say for sure until you try it. I have a few housings, and my home dive bud still has my old DC100 housing.
     

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