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My Rix SA-6 Diesel

Discussion in 'Compressors, Boosters & Blending Systems' started by rob.mwpropane, Nov 11, 2020.

  1. -JD-

    -JD- Eclecticist ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Greater Philadelphia, PA
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    What are the negatives?
    How "bad"?
     
  2. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
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  3. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    17,099
    20,797
  4. rob.mwpropane

    rob.mwpropane Contributor

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    If you're referring to me then yes I did and that's what I assumed that it was, but I was told it was a PMV;

     
  5. rob.mwpropane

    rob.mwpropane Contributor

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    Is there an easy test if / when I get this PMV or check valve in my hand to confirm what it is? I'd like to change things up at the compressor and have the OPV upstream of this piece for safety.

    Can I manually blow through a check valve but not a PMV? I believe a check valve only needs ~ 1psi or so to open?
     
  6. couv

    couv Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: 13th floor of the Ivory Tower
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    It depends on the check valve. Most of the time 1 or 2 psi (or less) is all it takes to open a check valve in the desired direction. Of course it should hold all pressure in the opposite direction. A PMV should not open until the desired pressure is achieved-usually about 2000 psi give or take a bit. So yes, easy enough to test. Remember, you want the gauge on upstream side of the PMV to find it's cracking pressure.
     
  7. rob.mwpropane

    rob.mwpropane Contributor

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    Understood, that's what I was thinking.

    As far as the gauge goes, I believe having it connected right at the 3rd stage coalescer would do just that. Wherever it holds before it starts flowing into the tower would be where it's set? It wouldn't start climbing until the tower was pressurized beyond that.
     
  8. couv

    couv Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: 13th floor of the Ivory Tower
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    I'm not sure I'm following you. To test a one way valve: Supply pressure-->one way valve-->put your finger a balloon here and you should get flow. Reverse the valve and you should not get flow.

    To test the PMV: Supply pressure-->gauge--->PMV -->put your finger a balloon here . You should not have any flow until the PMV opens at the predetermined pressure (around 2000 psi.)
     
  9. rob.mwpropane

    rob.mwpropane Contributor

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    Yes Sir, understood about testing with it off in my hand.

    I meant testing to see where it's set with the unit running and watching the gauge (if it is a PMV).
     
  10. couv

    couv Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: 13th floor of the Ivory Tower
    6,108
    3,973
    Yes, at what pressure will the balloon start to inflate? That is what you want to know.
     
    rob.mwpropane likes this.

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