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Rescue or ???

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by MissBehavin, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Lt CHEG

    Lt CHEG Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Rensselaer County, NY
    77
    38
    18
    I completely agree. CPR and an AED is the best we can do, so we absolutely should make every effort. I was just trying to point out that all too often CPR is not enough and if it isn’t enough one shouldn’t beat themselves up about it. If you’ve done all you can and the outcome isn’t what you hoped then be glad that you did all that you can instead of beating yourself up for not having done enough.
     
    eleniel, markmud and OceanEyes like this.
  2. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    13,631
    10,136
    113
    This.

    I've been put through a few first aid training sessions, and what they almost always stress is:
    If you don't do anything, the victim will probably die.
    If you do something, the victim may survive.

    Doing nothing is worse than doing something.
     
    eleniel, markmud and GrafCanuck like this.
  3. txaggie08

    txaggie08 Barracuda

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Vidor, TX
    277
    94
    43

    Absolutely, and no responder will ever tell you not to try, nor will they not try. You just need to, for your own mental well being, understand before you make the first compression, that the person is likely already gone.

    Mental health for dispatch and street responders is something that has been ignored for decades, but some of us in the middle of our careers are starting to push the point on talking about. Learning to come to terms with the idea you did 100% everything you could do, but they didnt live, is one of the hardest parts to swallow.

    There are several 911 calls I can recount to you verbatim. They will be with me the rest of my life. All I can do is live with the fact I did my best.
     
  4. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    13,631
    10,136
    113
    Which should be a good thing to live with, but I guess it usually isn't so.

    I've been lucky. I've only been in one situation where I had to provide first aid. That guy didn't make it, and I really don't want another experience like that. No matter that we probably did everything right.

    I have a ton of respect for those who choose a job which puts them in this kind of situations regularly. I'm very much not sure that I could've had a job like that.
     
    BlueTrin likes this.
  5. drjtprice

    drjtprice Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Saxlingham Nethergate England
    79
    79
    18
    Sometimes what looks terrible and a worst case scenario may not be. I was part of a training dive (NASDS Dive Coordinators) into Scripps Canyon (deep dive). My buddy and I were up and waiting for the rest of the class to surface when one of the divers rocketed up, seems like halfway out of the water, bright red blood pouring out of his nose. We all thought &(&(*, embolism. We immediately started signaling for the lifeguards and the instructor and one other started towing the victim to shore while the rest of us came along behind and kept signaling. This was in the days BEFORE in water resuscitation. Finally, a different lifeguard stand noticed us (not the closest one) and the real rescue started. They get the victim to shore, into an ambulance with the instructor and head full speed to the closest chamber. Fortunately, in that case, it turned out to be ruptured sinuses and not an embolism. It was soon after that some of us started wondering if there might be a way to perform in water resuscitation for long water rescues.
     
  6. NAUI Wowie

    NAUI Wowie Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Silicon Valley northern CA
    733
    317
    63
    who is better to rescue someone, a person with disabilities? Or no one in the viscinity or scared divers watching it happen? Of course if you can dive then you can rescue. Disability or no disability. I cant believe people would tell you not to take the course or that you could not help a situation.

    great job not listening to naysayers
     
    Rooster59 likes this.
  7. NAUI Wowie

    NAUI Wowie Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Silicon Valley northern CA
    733
    317
    63
    all humans have the capability for superhuman power. If a disabled diver without a limb is your only rescue then you will be glad if they attempt to save your life. If a person wants to risk their life to save yours that is their human right to try to save you. Now that being said having a disabled diver taking rescue will make them a better diver in multiple ways even without physically dragging your possibly overweight body to shore......

    come on man....I mean wow
     
  8. KWS

    KWS ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SE TEXAS
    4,524
    1,097
    113
    Really you think a one armed or one leg person can successfully do a rescue? Loose a fin sometime as see how well you do in the water. I have no problem with anyone taking a class. but reality has to set in sometime to say your disability counters the effort possibly to the point of being useless depending on the limitation. This is a reality and not a PC matter.
    And before you ask i will tell you. I would not refuse to dive with a disabled diver depending on the dive. I also would,,,, not with out question, expect them to be able to render any meaningful emergency assistance if needed. The most likely situation would be for them to be part of a 3some on the dive. Call it what you want, but that is the way it is.
     
  9. Rooster59

    Rooster59 Solo Diver

    360
    204
    43
    One example of a rescue is to drop the weights of someone struggling on the surface & put air in their BC. It's not necessarily a ascent from 100 ft. and a 400m tow.
     
  10. Manatee Diver

    Manatee Diver Manta Ray

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Tampa Bay, FL
    927
    630
    93
    That is a pretty wide brush you are painting. I suggest taking stock of the type of people you see on the dive boat, there are a lot of people with two legs or two arms that have issues lifting a simple AL80 or struggle against a mild current. Many of those people even have rescue cards.
     
    eleniel, MrBigfins and dumpsterpurrs like this.

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