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Shooting salt water up my nose everyday & feeling good! Anybody else doing this?

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by UnderSeaBumbleBee, Oct 19, 2007.

  1. dave4868

    dave4868 Old diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Vero Beach, FL, USA
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    I don't doubt that the manufacturers that sell ONLY gravity or low pressure nasal irrigation systems won't recommend more aggressive positive pressure irrigation. Perhaps they have good medical reasons.

    Those manufacturers that sell positive pressure and/or pulsing nasal irrigation devices have some good reasons for recommending their techniques. Just for additional info, here are some studies to back up the efficacy of a particular positive pressure system:

    Nasal Irrigation - Sinusitis - Medical Reports

    Regarding the use of positive pressure nasal irrigation such as I've described, using some knowledge and common sense should help one avoid excesses which might be harmful.

    Dave C
     
  2. merxlin

    merxlin ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: So. Cal.
    6,088
    685
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    My personal preference is for the Sinus Rinse squeeze bottle for the reasons in your noted study. NeilMed (I believe the largest seller of nasal irrigation products) sells both, including a positive pressure pulsating pump, and does not recommend closing the opposite nostril. My point is that none of the manufacturers that I've seen recommend closing off the opposite nostril. They are consistent in the directions to allow the liquid to drain from the opposite side. From Ayr's directions: "In order to prevent pressure on the ear drum, do not block nasal passages completely."
     
    UnderSeaBumbleBee likes this.
  3. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
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  4. fjpatrum

    fjpatrum Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: DC area
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    I wonder if those who died bothered to actually use hot water or even add salt to it. It seems to me most "Fresh water microbes" aren't going to survive long in salt water. Of course it also could mean I just won't use tap water next time I visit LA; sounds like they're not doing a good job of cleaning it.
     
    merxlin likes this.
  5. merxlin

    merxlin ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: So. Cal.
    6,088
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    Naegleria fowleri infection is rare in the U.S. — only 32 cases have been documented from 2001 to 2010, according to the CDC. Most infections result from diving into warm, stagnant water. There were four deaths linked to the parasite last summer.If I lived in Louisiana, I think I'd get my tap water checked for a lot of other things.
     
    UnderSeaBumbleBee likes this.
  6. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,414
    621
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    "...rare..."

    "...only 32 cases...'

    But 2 of those "rare" 32 cases were people shooting water up their noses.

    Things that make you go "Hmmmmmmm........."
     
  7. merxlin

    merxlin ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: So. Cal.
    6,088
    685
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    ALL of the cases were people with water up their nose. That's the point. Why is LA having this issue when all other states are not? The articles make it sound like the nasal irrigation is causing the deaths. I'd look at the cause, and not the delivery system. Now that said, If I was in LA I would not be using tap water, that's for sure.
     
  8. UnderSeaBumbleBee

    UnderSeaBumbleBee Solo Diver

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    Doc, you understand then that the other 30 deaths came from swimming and diving in water! Hmmm 30 deaths. Something to think about if diving is for you! There are more people worldwide rinsing every day on this planet than diving or swimming every single day. I will give you $100 for all your gear, but more importantly I will save you from diving in waters that are not purified in which many microbes live!

    Seriously, you have a municipal source not properly cleaning and purifying their water. That means kids swimming in pools, playing the sprinklers and so forth are at risk for DEATH. DEATH I SAY DEATH. Kids almost always get water up their nose swimming. The issue here is not people rinsing but a water system that is not doing its job and trying to make someone else out to be the bad guy.
     
    carriemak likes this.
  9. divepsych

    divepsych Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Raleigh NC
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    When I have represented NeilMed Pharmaceuticals Sinus Rinse at scuba trade and consumer shows, the official company policy is that irrigation should only be performed using distilled water, never tap or other water. The two recent deaths involved water that was not distilled.

    Another comment, the official company policy was also that the opposite nostril is never to be blocked or closed off in any way during a positive pressure nasal irrigation. Water is incompressible and forcing it could result in serious injury.
     
    merxlin likes this.
  10. John_B

    John_B Grasshopper

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    Did anyone else catch Monday night's "House" episode where they eventually deduced their patient had meningitis acquired from using a Neti Pot with tap water instead of distilled water?
     

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