• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Rescue of DIR style Diver

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba' started by g1138, May 22, 2011.

  1. g1138

    g1138 Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Charleston, SC
    3,068
    809
    I haven't had much experience in a Bp/W. I'm currently saving up for one and just generally asking questions about techniques and anything else that could come up when I do get one.
    So as of right now that's my opinion. I'm sure it'll change when I get more in water experience with one. It just seems to me that unhooking the crotch strap would make the plate less stable if the wing were inflated. It could shift off the center of the diver's back when you're bringing them from depth. It just seems to me that the diver and their Bp/W are no longer a single unit once you take the waist and crotch straps off.
     
  2. kanonfodr

    kanonfodr Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Seattle, Wa
    1,486
    104
    If your harness is sized properly, then your backplate will remain very much attached to you. It takes a bit of work to ditch and don a BP/W at depth (done it, it was nasty) since the shoulder straps do hold on to your torso quite well.

    Unhooking the crotch strap will mostly cause your rig to ride up on your backside, especially at the surface when you are floating vertically. It's entirely possible to dive a BP/W without a crotch strap, but it's kind of a PITA compared to using the crotch strap.

    Peace,
    Greg

     
  3. TSandM

    TSandM Missed and loved by many. Rest in Peace ScubaBoard Supporter

    36,349
    13,626
    g1138, you are right . . . once you have undone the waist buckle and dropped the crotch strap, the rig has a lot of degrees of freedom. I would absolutely not do that at depth, unless it were the only way to get the diver headed to the surface. And a properly weighted diver shouldn't need that.

    When you are at depth, with someone who is unresponsive (and particularly if they aren't breathing) I don't think you should care if their rig will get unstable, or if their ascent will be faster than optimal. An unresponsive diver who is not breathing at depth is a body recovery until proven otherwise -- nothing you do in that setting is "wrong". I would start by trying to get them up without dropping weights or undoing the harness, but if you can't, do what you need to do to bring them up. Survival is at least a distant hope on the surface. It is not possible at depth.
     
    aquaregia and g1138 like this.
  4. TSandM

    TSandM Missed and loved by many. Rest in Peace ScubaBoard Supporter

    36,349
    13,626
    g1138, you are right . . . once you have undone the waist buckle and dropped the crotch strap, the rig has a lot of degrees of freedom. I would absolutely not do that at depth, unless it were the only way to get the diver headed to the surface. And a properly weighted diver shouldn't need that.

    When you are at depth, with someone who is unresponsive (and particularly if they aren't breathing) I don't think you should care if their rig will get unstable, or if their ascent will be faster than optimal. An unresponsive diver who is not breathing at depth is a body recovery until proven otherwise -- nothing you do in that setting is "wrong". I would start by trying to get them up without dropping weights or undoing the harness, but if you can't, do what you need to do to bring them up. Survival is at least a distant hope on the surface. It is not possible at depth.
     
  5. Crush

    Crush Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Western Canada
    2,517
    481
    I know that DIR/GUE types like to "ride" the unconscious diver up, controlling the ascent from above. This seems to work with a rider in trimmed-out gear. What happens if you encounter a non-DIR/GUE diver who is badly out-of-trim? If the diver is in cold water they might need a great deal of ballast and be badly out-of-trim. Can you "ride up" a diver who is essentially vertical in the water column? I am imagining this - essentially sitting on someone's head. No matter how I imagine this, it cracks me up. I am afraid that suitable photos might end up in the Pub...

    Seriously - DIR/GUE folks - how do you rescue someone who has not converted?
     
  6. LouieLouie

    LouieLouie Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Bergen, Norway
    153
    26
    I think we can all agree that out-of-trim divers can't be saved.
     
    Crush likes this.
  7. *dave*

    *dave* Instructor, Scuba

    964
    163
    Unconscious divers are notorious for having bad trim, regardless of their kit or diving philosophy.

     
    rjack321 likes this.
  8. aquaregia

    aquaregia NAUI Instructor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Santa Cruz, CA
    1,969
    191
    The point of this thread is to determine how to rescue someone in DIR gear, not the other way around.

    I suppose that (seeing as they clearly aren't your teammate) protocol probably calls for a lift bag :)
     
  9. aquaregia

    aquaregia NAUI Instructor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Santa Cruz, CA
    1,969
    191
    Once my crotchstrap's free my shoulder straps are quite loose indeed. I have no problems doing ditch & dons underwater. I agree that it isn't likely to come loose on it's own.
    Even if it does, I'm sure it's more buoyant without the backplate :)
     
  10. Adobo

    Adobo DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Northern Cali
    1,592
    336
    I found that performing this exercise on a diver in a vertical position is far easier than on one who is in a horizontal position. This is probably largely due to the fact that I have only tried this on divers wearing drysuits. In these cases, the rescuer needs to be mindful of gas getting trapped in the rescuee's boots. If this did happen, the situation could get completely unmanageable very quickly. Whereas on a diver in the horizontal position, the gas in the drysuit naturally migrates to the shoulders making it 1) not necessary to worry about gas getting trapped in the rescuee's boots and 2) easier to vent the rescuee's drysuit in general.

    I think the idea with trying to "rescue" a diver in the horizontal position is that it allows the rescuer the ability to move himself and the rescuee forwards, backwards and sideways as needed. You can imagine why having the ability to move a rescuee in that manner might be somewhat advantageous in an overhead environment.

    Hmmm... that's a whole 'nuther topic. :p
     

Share This Page